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News from the Department of Art and Art History
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DEPARTMENT ANNOUNCEMENTS


A Sense of Place: A two-day online symposium about New York City
Organized by Graduate Students in the Hunter College
Department of Art & Art History
online and open to the public by RSVP 
January 12-13, 2021


Assemblage Journal, Issue 1: Fall 2020


MFA Thesis Spotlight hosted by Hauser & Wirth


Nicky Enright: Sense Us 2020
Hunter East Harlem Gallery
(Viewable from 119th Street Windows)
2180 3rd Avenue at 119th Street
New York, NY
Through January 31, 2021



FACULTY & STAFF ANNOUNCEMENTS

 

Beer With a Painter: Lisa Corinne Davis in Hyperallergic



Exhibition publication for Take What You Can't Get 
curated by Christina Freeman with ABC NO Rio in Exile, 
now available online and in print 

 

Paul Ramírez Jonas, Eternal Flame
Socrates Sculpture Park
32-01 Vernon Boulevard
Long Island City, NY
Through March 14


ANNOUNCEMENTS & OPPORTUNITIES


The Luminary is seeking a full-time Gallery Director starting in 2021

The Virtual Havner Curatorial Summer Internship at Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, Applications due January 15


11th Annual Rutgers University Art History Graduate Symposium, Mnemonic Aesthetics: Memory and Trauma in Art, Deadline: January 22

Metropolitan Museum of Art Summer and Long-term 2021 Internships: Application Deadline: January 27

Ten-Week MuSe Program Summer Internship in European Sculpture and Decorative Arts at Metropolitan Museum of Art
Application Deadline: January 27

American Folk Art Museum's annual Anne Hill Blanchard Uncommon Artists Lecture: Sunday, January 31st

The Peter A. Krueger Summer Internship Program at Cooper Hewitt
Application Deadline: February 1

CALL FOR PAPERS: 17th Annual University of Oregon Graduate Symposium in the History of Art & Architecture, Deadline: February 15


Emergency Resources for Artists

Online Events and Resources


A Sense of Place

January 12-13



In September 2019, our group of twelve graduate students in the Department of Art & Art History at Hunter College traveled to Dakar, Senegal to study with curator Koyo Kouoh and her team at RAW Material Company, a non-profit art center offering research and residency programs for artists and curators alongside seasonal exhibitions, publications, and lectures. The focus of our time in Dakar with Kouoh was how curatorial practice can make the presence of a place visible, or in her words: “How have actors, active in our local contexts and from across the creative disciplines, responded to and shaped their – our – environment? How do they collaborate? How do they tell stories and recall history? How do they create sites of possibility?”
 
We returned to New York with these questions in mind, and, in partnership with Kouoh, organized a symposium of programming in response, originally scheduled for March 2020, then postponed due to the global pandemic. Since that time, the question of place seems more relevant than ever. Presented now, in an online format, our symposium considers gentrification and displacement, infrastructures of surveillance, and sustainability as they relate to how artists see themselves shaping, and being shaped by, their immediate environments.
 
All events are online and open to the public by RSVP except where otherwise noted.
 
This symposium grew out of a graduate seminar with students Chris Berntsen, Beatrice Johnson, Simon Benjamin, Renate Prancane, Leonardo Madriz, D'Arcy Blake, Malanya Graham, Alison Dillulio, Sydney Shavers, Sarah McCaffery, Daniela Mayer, and Christina Barrera.

FULL SCHEDULE

January 12th
 
10:00-11:30am EST
Billie Zangewa: Studio visit with Koyo Kouoh and Malanya Graham 
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/87412898056
 
7:00-8:30pm EST
Surveillance City: Examining the Urban Panopticon from 9/11 to Covid
Panel discussion with Ingrid Burrington, Fabian Rogers, and Hasan Elahi, moderated by Janus Rose
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/85971874908


January 13th
 
10:00-11:30am EST
Project EATS with Linda Goode Bryant: Studio visit with Koyo Kouoh and Simon Benjamin
**Closed event for Hunter College students and members of the RAW Material Company** Hunter College students interested in attending this event should email info@theartistsinstitute.org for a link.

7:00-8:45pm EST
Countering Erasure
Film screening and panel discussion with Tourmaline, Howardena Pindell, and Ayesha Williams of The Laundromat Project; moderated by Siona Wilson.
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/85876840294
 
Online Screening: 7:00-7:45pm
Moderated conversation: 7:45-8:45pm

For detailed descriptions of each event visit: 
huntercollegeart.org/sop/

 

The editorial board of Assemblage, a peer-reviewed journal of graduate art historical research, is pleased to present our first issue. Our inaugural publication features stellar papers by Hunter MA and MFA students Rose Bishop, D’Arcy Blake, Kristen Clevenson, Kathleen Granados, and Veronika Anna Molnár. Please find the open-access publication at assemblagejournal.org, and follow our Instagram @assemblagejournal for updates, information on future issues, and images of MFA artwork. Any questions can be directed to assemblagejournal@gmail.com


www.assemblagejournal.org

Image: Sokari Douglas Camp: Battle Bus (2006). Photograph by Martin LeSanto-Smith. Courtesy of the artist and Platform. From the paper Art, Petro-Violence, and Neocolonialism in Nigeria by Veronika Anna Molnár.
 

MFA THESIS SPOTLIGHT
HOSTED BY HAUSER & WIRTH
 

Last spring, the MFA Thesis Exhibitions for 19 graduating students were disrupted by the COVID-19 pandemic. This fall we are presenting their work in four exhibitions at 205 Hudson Street, and Hauser & Wirth will host an online exhibition featuring the 19 artists beginning November 10.


Echoing the exhibitions at 205 Hudson, The Hauser & Wirth spotlight will unfold online with the same four thematic groupings, ‘Gravity Spell’, ‘Thresholds’, ‘Interstices’, and ‘Save the Last Dance,’ which highlight the students’ diverse approaches to medium, technique, and subject matter. These groups of works will be accompanied by interviews and texts from Joachim Pissarro, Professor of Art History and Director of the Hunter College Galleries, and Carrie Moyer, Director of MFA Program in Studio Art. The presentation will also include photographs and videos that further illuminate the working processes and vision behind each student’s practice.
 

Nicky Enright: Sense Us 2020

Hunter East Harlem Gallery
(Viewable from 119th Street Windows)
2180 3rd Avenue at 119th Street
New York, NY

August 15, 2020 - January 31, 2021

Sense Us 2020 is a mixed-media installation of images and text on flattened shipping boxes by artist Nicky Enright. It is a public response to the questions around race on the current 2020 U.S. Census. Created to mimic the aesthetic of protest signs on cardboard and with a symbolically limited palette of black, white, and brown, the installation points to America’s pervasive fixation on race/ethnicity criteria and status checkboxes.  

Through the dynamic installation of Sense Us 2020, Enright strives to understand the connections among the race/ethnicity boxes on the census and other boxes of this historical moment: from the casket boxes of recurrent racist violence, to election-year ballot boxes and quarantine and intubation boxes; from mass incarceration, to town “squares” and monument pedestal boxes; from Zoom/Skype boxes, Amazon boxes, and cash vaults to riot-police kettling, a state-of-the-art form of containment.

Hunter East Harlem Gallery is currently closed due to the COVID-19 Pandemic but the Hallway Gallery can be seen through the windows on 119th Street.

 


Exhibition publication for Take What You Can't Get 
curated by Christina Freeman with ABC NO Rio in Exile, 
now available online and in print.

 
Inspired by the role of artists as imaginators, and agitators, from the 1930s to the present day, Take What You Can't Get embraces our current moment of multilayered crisis (economic, racial justice, leadership, health) as an opportunity for artists to actively imagine a more desirable future. The exhibition's title addresses pre-existing artworld expectations of austerity and extreme inequality - that artists and art workers must take what they can get. The four projects, by three collectives and one artist, respond to the following questions: What do artists and art workers need now? What does our NYC community need now (and how can artists help)? What should we demand of our institutions - art or government? What does a more beautiful future look like? Projects take place both on-line and in New York City throughout the duration of the exhibition. Curated by Christina Freeman.

 

Paul Ramírez Jonas, Eternal Flame

Socrates Sculpture Park
32-01 Vernon Boulevard
Long Island City, NY

Through March 14

Paul Ramírez Jonas’ ‘Eternal Flame’ is a monument in the form of a communal grill and imagines cooking culture as both a symbolic and real eternal flame – there is always a lit cooking fire somewhere on this globe. The work honors the role of cuisine and cooking in cultural cohesion and expression among communities and identities,  even when individuals and families relocate locally, nationally or internationally.

‘Eternal Flame’ is designed to recognize the importance of dialogue and exchange.
During this new time of social distancing the grill will not be available for public use, but instead bring people together philosophically and culturally through the common experience of cooking and eating. With this in mind, a series of videos will be released with local and distant chefs invited by the artist to address the meaning of the eternal flame while preparing recipes and relating stories on each dish’s significance. Ramírez Jonas imagines cooking culture as a symbolic eternal flame, enduring in communities for generations, over vast distances.
 

We are currently recruiting students for Arts Intern! Studio Institute has been offering immersive internships at museums and cultural institutions for over 20 years, and we're excited to announce this new Winter-Spring opportunity for New York students! 

 

Arts Intern, which was started by Agnes Gund in 1999, is a grant-supported program that pairs financial aid-dependent college students with paid positions at arts and cultural organizations, where they gain real world experience and forge professional relationships. These institutions include the Brooklyn Museum, the Studio Museum in Harlem, and MoMA PS1. Positions are available in a range of departments, including but not limited to Curatorial, Collections, Education, Design, and Marketing. We had tremendous success providing both remote and on-site internships during the summer program, and are excited to continue through the school year. Applications are open now!

https://www.artsintern.org


The Nantucket Historical Association (NHA) seeks a graduate student or post-doctoral scholar in American art for a short-term project starting January 15, 2021. Individuals with diverse backgrounds, experiences, and abilities are encouraged to apply for this internship.
 
The NHA has digitized and transcribed the diaries and notebooks of the artist, Anne Ramsdell Congdon (1873-1958) and seeks someone to read through them and create a biographical narrative which also places her work in the larger context of American art. This person will assist in curating a summer exhibition of about 40 works by Congdon, which have already been identified. The duties will include using the biographical narrative to write exhibition labels, produce an article or articles about the show in Historic Nantucket, a magazine published quarterly, and generally assist with the production of the exhibition. Ultimately, the museum plans to produce a full-scale catalog about the work of this little-known but highly talented artist, so there are future opportunities for the person who fills this position. Some of the work can be done remotely and free lodging will be available when on island.
 
Please send a cover letter and resume to Amelia Holmes, aholmes@nha.org.
Deadline for applications is Sunday, December 20.
 
Mnemonic Aesthetics: Memory and Trauma in Art

11th Annual Art History Graduate Student Symposium
Organized by the Rutgers University Art History Graduate Student Organization (AHGSO)

April 22nd & April 23rd, 2021
Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey New Brunswick, NJ 08901

“Memory is always transitory, notoriously unreliable, and haunted by forgetting —in short, human and social...If the sense of lived time is being renegotiated in our contemporary cultures of memory, we should not forget that time is not only the past, its preservation and transmission.”

-- Andreas Huyssen, Present Pasts: Media, Politics, Amnesia, 2000

Memory has been central to the vocabularies of artists and art theorists since its translation from ancient rhetoric to visual arts scholarship in the early modern period. Recently, scholars have addressed the relationship between memory and the history of art, employing diverse methods from memory theory to decolonialism, postcolonialism, and eco-art history. Mnemonic aesthetics – a concept stressed by Cheryl Finley in her book, Committed to Memory: The Art of the Slave Ship Icon – emphasizes a practice of ritualized remembering which sustains cultural possession and collective memory of shared traumas, especially in regards to slavery. Through acts of repetition, visual communication and performance allow memories that would otherwise succumb to cultural amnesia to be preserved. These acts attempt to revitalize and reinvigorate history by strengthening present ties to the past. This symposium will explore how memory, in particular traumatic memory, has informed the visual arts across chronologies.

The Rutgers University Art History Graduate Student Organization seeks submissions that examine questions of trauma and memory in the visual arts. Abstracts are welcome from all historical periods, disciplines, and methodological perspectives. Submissions will be considered for 20-minute presentations in English. After the symposium, one paper will be selected for possible publication in Volume 38 of the Rutgers Art Review, a peer-reviewed, open-access journal produced by graduate students in the Department of Art History.

Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

•   Forced migration and diaspora studies

•   Development, destruction, and dislocation

•   Eco-art history, the anthropocene, and environmental humanities

•   War and genocide

•   Repression and invisibility

•   Ruins and fragmentary remnants of the past

•   Decolonial and postcolonial studies

•   Medical trauma

•   Cultural amnesia

•   Protests and activism


Please send your abstract and a current CV to rutgersarthistorygradsymposium@gmail.com by January 22. Abstracts should be no more than 300 words. Applicants will be notified of the committee’s decision by January 31.

Due to COVID-19 restrictions, this year’s symposium will be held virtually, via Zoom. If you are interested in attending as an audience member, registration will be required. A link to register along with the symposium schedule will be circulated in the months leading up to the symposium. Please direct all questions to rutgersarthistorygradsymposium@gmail.com


Julia Katz, Ph.D. Student
Department of Art History
Rutgers University

julia.r.katz@rutgers.edu
THE MET
 
Summer 2021 Undergraduate and Graduate Internship Program

Join a community of interns to gain professional skills and learn about museum practice! We are currently accepting applications for paid Summer and Long-Term 2021 internships on-site at The Met in a wide range of department areas.

Application deadline: January 27, 11:59 pm ET

New! We're excited to announce a special ten-week internship placement in the Department of European Sculpture and Decorative Arts for someone with an interest in European sculpture and the histories of race, slavery, colonialism, and empire. This full-time summer internship (with the possibility of a part-time extension in the fall) is part of the Museum Seminar (MuSe) Internship Program. The intern will gain curatorial skills by working closely with staff on organizing an exhibition around Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux's marble bust Why Born Enslaved! (modeled 1869, carved 1873). They will assist with researching objects, updating the checklist, and writing and developing didactic materials. Additionally, the intern will have the opportunity to contribute to the department’s social media platforms. This internship is ideal for someone with an interest in European art, issues of race and representation in Western art, and a desire to contribute to efforts to diversify the narratives explored in museum collections and their display. Applicants should select the Department of European Sculpture and Decorative Arts (ESDA) on the application. 

More Info
 
Ten-Week MuSe Program Summer Internship in European Sculpture and Decorative Arts at The Met

The Met is offering a summer 2021 MuSe Internship placement in the Department of European Sculpture and Decorative Arts for an undergraduate, graduate student or recent graduate with a special interest in European sculpture and the histories of race, slavery, colonialism, and empire. This full-time summer internship (with the possibility of a part-time extension in the fall) is part of the Museum Seminar Internship Program.  The intern will gain curatorial skills by working closely with staff on organizing an exhibition around Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux’s marble bust Why Born Enslaved! (modeled 1869, carved 1873). The intern will work under the guidance of the curatorial team and assist with researching objects, updating the checklist, and writing and developing didactic materials. Additionally, the intern will have the opportunity to contribute to the department’s social media platforms. This internship is ideal for someone with an interest in European art, issues of race and representation in Western art, and a desire to contribute to efforts to diversify the narratives explored in museum collections and their display.   

Ideal candidates for internships at The Met are those for whom the opportunity offers a growth experience. Previous museum experience is not required, but enthusiasm for a hands-on experience and strong communication skills are helpful.    

Commitment: June 7–August 13, 2021. Full-time, five days, thirty-five hours per week, with the option to extend on a part-time basis in the fall semester. 
Compensation: $17 per hour, plus $1,500 toward housing/travel to New York City (less applicable taxes and deductions). 

Eligibility: Open to current undergraduate sophomores, juniors, and seniors, recent undergraduate graduates from a bachelor’s or associate’s program, master’s-level graduate students, and first- and second-year PhD students.  

Application deadline: January 27, 2021, 11:59PM (ET) 

Notification: by the end of April 2021 

Please see The Met’s website for full details about the MuSe Internship Program and to apply. *Interested candidates must select the Department of European Sculpture and Decorative Arts (ESDA) as one of their placement choices on the application.*

Questions? Email collegeprograms@metmuseum.org 

This internship is made possible through the generous support of Richard Chilton, Jr. 
 

American Folk Art Museum's annual Anne Hill Blanchard Uncommon Artists Lecture, will be held online on Sunday, January 31st. 

Dedicated to showcasing new scholarship on self-taught art, this year's program includes talks by Dr. Elaine Y. Yau on Rosie Lee Tompkins, Dr. Erin O’Toole on April Dawn Alison’s photography, and Dr. Nicole R. Fleetwood on carceral aesthetics. We thought this program might be of interest to you and your academic community; program details are included below.

This Zoom webinar is free with registration. 

2021 Anne Hill Blanchard Uncommon Artists Lecture

On Sunday, January 31st, at 1:00 p.m. ET, the Anne Hill Blanchard Uncommon Artists Lecture will present new research in the field of self-taught art with talks by Dr. Elaine Y. Yau on personal and material transformation in the work of Rosie Lee Tompkins, Dr. Erin O’Toole on April Dawn Alison’s photography, and Dr. Nicole R. Fleetwood on carceral aesthetics and prison portrait practices. Find out more and register online.

 

Tangible: Expanded Materiality and Art History 

CALL FOR PAPERS

17th Annual University of Oregon Graduate Symposium in the History of Art & Architecture
 

Deadline: February 15, 2021

Symposium Date: April 17, 2021
 

As a discipline, art history is largely focused on physical materials. Canvas, clay, paper, and stone define works of art and reveal the hands of their artists. From formal analysis to new materialism, art historians espouse methods that recognize objects’ physical properties and provide insight into the context of their production. Though rooted in traditional art historical methodologies, material studies are increasingly situated in the expanded field. Art historians now examine the physical makeup of artworks in relation to site, social practice, and historical context. This new focus allows scholars to critically investigate methods of exchange, examining relationships between artists, media, and viewers. However, this turn to materialism has come at a time when digital technology frequently mediates access to physical objects. The COVID-19 pandemic exacerbates this tension, as access to archives and museums is limited. In this current moment, what does materiality offer to art history?  

This symposium investigates the turn to materialism in art history, redirecting attention to physical objects, their entanglements within a site, and their relationship with viewers. We invite graduate students in all areas of study to critically engage with materials as they relate to art historical scholarship. Possible topics include but are not limited to: 

-    Modes of production
-    Material culture
-    Visual and formal analysis
-    Tangibility
-    Impacts of digitization on art historical methods
-    Eco art and recycled materials
-    Expanded understandings of “canvas”
-    Adjusted methodologies in light of COVID-19
-    Reproduction and restoration
-    New materialism

Applicants should submit an abstract of no more than 300 words, a paper title, and a current CV to uosymposium@gmail.com. The deadline for submissions is Monday, February 15, 2021. Selected speakers will be notified on March 1, 2021 and are expected to accept or decline the offer within one week of notification. Papers should be 20 minutes in length and will be followed by a question and answer session.  

The symposium will be held virtually on Saturday, April 17, 2021, with a joint keynote lecture by Dr. Heather Shirey and Dr. David Todd Lawrence. Dr. Shirey is a Professor of Art History at the University of St. Thomas in Saint Paul, Minnesota, USA. Her teaching and research focus on race and identity, migrations and diasporas, and street art and its communities. Dr. Lawrence is Associate Professor of English at the University of St. Thomas, where he teaches African-American literature and culture, folklore studies, and cultural studies. Together with geographer Dr. Paul Lorah, Dr. Shirey and Dr. Lawrence co-direct the Urban Art Mapping research team. Urban Art Mapping is a multi-disciplinary group of faculty and students from the College of Arts and Sciences at the University of St. Thomas. The group created and manages two street art archives: the Covid-19 Street Art Database and the George Floyd and Anti-Racist Street Art Database. 

This symposium is generously sponsored by the University of Oregon Department of the History of Art & Architecture and the University of Oregon Art History Student Association 

 


Emergency Resources for Artists

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