History Major Newsletter - March 2017
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FOOTNOTES • March 2017

Dear Students

This month's Footnotes will highlight:

  • Speakers and Events
  • Welcome Subah Dayal -- New Faculty in South Asian History
  • Interested in Foreign Policy: Meet Tulane's Diplomat in Residence, Kali Jones
  • Summer Classes, Tulane History Department
  • Tulane's 4+1 Program, MA in History
  • Graduate Certificate in Digital Public Humanities, George Mason University
  • Documentary Film Screenings
  • Students in the News, Madeline Goebel, '17 and June Murphy '16
  • Student Opportunities: Grants 

Events and Speakers


Toward an Intellectual History of Black Women


A Discussion with Dr. Martha Jones and Dr. Mia Bay
Friday, March 17th
7pm
Freeman Auditorium, Woldenberg Art Center

Martha Jones teaches at the University of Michigan. She is a Presidential Bicentennial Professor, professor of history and Afroamerican and African Studies, and a member of the Affiliated Faculty at the Law School.

Mia Bay is a Professor of History and the
Director of the Center for Race and Ethnicity at Rutgers University.

Documentary Screening and Q and A
with Dr. Jeffrey Gould

La Palabra en el Bosque / The Word in the Woods


Monday, March 20th, 6:00pm
Richardson Building 117

Dr. Gould is the Rudy Professor of History at Indiana University, Bloomington and the author of numerous books and articles and the co-producer of two documentary films on identity and revolution in Central America. His work is fundamentally interested in questions of identity, collective memory, symbolic violence and academic authority. His written work has been framed by an engagement with oral history and deep archival research. 

History in the News

Immigration:
Perspectives from Latin America


A Conversation with Professor Felipe Cruz and Professor Justin Wolfe


Wednesday, March 22nd, 5:30
Weatherhead Lounge

Pizza will be provided!

Book Club: Ben Winters book Underground Airlines 

 

Underground Airlines is one of several recent books that have used science fiction/speculative fiction to explore the history of slavery and racism?  What if slavery never ended in the United States?  What if we still had an underground railroad helping African-Americans to escape?  

The book is available on Reserve at Howard-Tilton Library and also electronically through online book sellers.  Contact Professor Adderley with any questions:  adderley@tulane.edu

Friday, April 21st
5:30
Dinner at Greenbaum Residence

Welcome Subah Dayal


Subah Dayal (PhD, UCLA) will be joining the  Tulane History Department in Fall 2017.   

Dr. Dayal received her PhD from UCLA in 2016. She is an expert in early modern South Asia, and she has also studied modern India.  Her book project, “Landscapes of Conquest between Region and Empire: Military Networks and Patronage in the Indo-Islamic World 1580-1700,” analyzes the southern-most portion of the Mughal empire in India. She has multiple languages, including Urdu, Urdu-Dakhani (early modern Urdu), Hindi, Modern Persian, Medieval Indo-Persian, Modern and 17th century Dutch, and Arabic.

In Fall 2017, she will be teaching HISC 2910 History of Modern India (MWF 12:00-12:50) and HISC 6910: Seminar in South Asian History (R 3:30-6pm).  She is excited to offer many classes at Tulane in South Asian history, such as “South Asian history in film and fiction,” “Women in Modern South Asia 1500-present,” and “Travelers and Travel-writing in the Indian Ocean World.”  

Summer Classes

 

Staying in New Orleans this summer?  Take a History Class.


First Session


HISA   2310 Medieval England, Professor Linda Pollock
A survey of the political, social, and intellectual development of England from the Anglo-Saxon period to 1485. 

HISB 2910 Africa and the United States, Professor McMahon
This course introduces students to U.S. policies toward Africa from the late eighteenth to the twenty-first century.  We will consider official government engagements between the United States and African governments, and we will explore the many individual actions taken by Americans and Africans to engage with one another.  


Second Session


HISL 2910 Latin American History in Cinema, Professor Felipe Cruz
This class will explore the history of Latin America through the lens of cinema. We will use films as a means to understand the relationship between history and memory as portrayed in this medium.

Diplomat in Residence: Kali Jones   


Interested in Interning with the State Department?  Looking for hands-on professional experience in foreign policy?


The State Department has internships for Fall, Spring, Summer, and Virtual Student Foreign Service internships.  For More information, see https://careers.state.gov/intern/student-internships 

Kali Jones (Tulane, JD/MSPH ) has served in Ho Chi Minh City, Port-au-Prince, and Brasilia.  In Washington, Jones worked in the Department of State’s 24/7 Operations Center, which is responsible for tracking global events and providing daily briefings to the Secretary of State and the senior staff. 

To set up a meeting with Kali Jones to discuss any of these programs -- click on the "Meet the Diplomat in Residence" tab on her website.

Graduate Programs


Tulane History 4+1 Program  

 

Interested in completing a Master’s degree in History in one year? 

Deadline: April 1 
 

The 4+1 program allows Tulane students to quickly earn a Master’s degree without the hassle of taking the GRE.  The program is available to students who have completed 3 or 4 6000-level history courses with a B or above to take one additional year of coursework to complete a Master’s degree.  You do not need to be a History major in order to do the 4+1 program.  The 4+1 program has a reduced tuition cost.  A Frequently Asked Questions sheet is available here.
 
If you have questions or would like to apply, please contact Professor Liz McMahon (emcmahon@tulane.edu).
 
 

Graduate Certificate in Digital Public Humanities, 
Department of History at George Mason University


The program trains students in the digital skills and tools that are increasingly essential to careers in education, public history, libraries, academia, publishing and many kinds of government and non-profit work. 

This 15-credit program consists of three online courses followed by a remote internship with a unit of the Smithsonian Institution. Because it is both online and part-time, students can pursue it while working or attending another graduate program. 

For more information:  http://to.gmu.edu/humanitiesonline

Documentary Film Series

Nostalgia for the Light (2010)

A hypnotic and moving documentary centered on
Chile's Atacama Desert where astronomers
examine distant galaxies, archaeologists uncover
traces of ancient civilizations, and women dig for
the remains of disappeared relatives.

Tuesday, March 21st, 6pm
Hebert 201

The Act of Killing (2013) 

A chilling and inventive documentary examines a
country where death squad leaders are
celebrated as heroes, and who are challenged in
the film to reenact their real-life mass killings in
the style of the American movies they love.

Tuesday, April 4th, 6:00pm
Hebert Hall 201

Two Towns of Jasper (2002)

In 1998 James Byrd, Jr., a black man, was
chained to a truck and dragged to death by three
white men. Two film crews, one black and one
white, document the aftermath of the murder in
the town of Jasper, Texas.  

Tuesday, April 11th, 6:00pm
Hebert Hall 201

When We Were Kings (1996)

The story of the famed “Rumble in the Jungle”
heavyweight match between Muhammad Ali and
George Foreman held in Zaire (now Democratic
Republic of Congo) in 1974.

Tuesday, April 18th, 6:00pm
Hebert Hall 201

Slavery and American History
Film Series

Twelve Years a Slave


Based on the story of one man's fight for survival and freedom. Before the Civil War, Solomon Northrup, a free black man from upstate New York, was abducted and sold into slavery. This film recounts his struggle to stay alive and retain his dignity.  
  
Wednesday, April 5th, 5:30pm
Greenbaum Residence Hall, First Floor Lounge

CSA:  Confederate States of America


Set in a contemporary alternative world where the Confederate States of America managed to win the American Civil War, a British film "documentary" examines the history of this nation. 

Wednesday, April 19th, 5:30pm
Greenbaum Residence Hall, First Floor Lounge

Student in the News


Madeline Goebel, '17


I had planned to write an Honors Thesis since my freshman year, but last summer, as the beginning of the school year and the deadline for the prospectus rapidly approached, I was still without a topic. A few weeks before the semester started, I found an archival collection at the Louisiana Research Collection on campus that captured my interest. The papers of the Friends of Widows and Orphans of the French Resistance (FWOFR), New Orleans Branch seemed to provide a perfect way to connect my concentrations of study: History, French, and Gender and Sexuality Studies.

From this collection, I formulated my research questions, focusing on the role of American women in aid work and on women as international actors in the World War II and early Cold War years. The FWOFR collection consisted of one box which, although filled with valuable material, was only enough for one chapter of my thesis.

With a concentration on female aid workers in mind, my research brought me to Anne Tracy Morgan, daughter of financier and banker John Pierpont Morgan, Francophile, and prolific aid worker. After the First World War, Morgan traveled to France, established an aid organization, and passionately worked to rehabilitate the Aisne department, located in the northeast part of France. In 1939, with war on the horizon in Europe, Morgan reformed her committee. Alongside other American women, she aided in the evacuation of France in 1940 and, after returning to the United States in 1941, continued to raise money to finance French relief during and immediately after World War II. Morgan died in 1952, but her dedication to France is still represented, with a memorial plaque located at the Hôtel des Invalides in Paris and the Association Anne Morgan still operating in the Aisne.
 
Anne Morgan’s papers are located at the Morgan Library in New York City. While there, I also performed research at the New York Public Library, looking at the records of American Relief for France, a wartime organization which oversaw all American relief work directed toward France. After four days of looking through thousands of documents, I left New York with invaluable information and insight and the material for my next chapter. Morgan’s personal papers and the material from her organization, American Friends of France, provided a lens through which I could further examine female aid workers within the broader context of World War II Franco-American relations and contemporary gender relations.

Having the opportunity to travel to these archives in New York was centrally important not only to my thesis, but also to my development as a student. I learned so much during this experience, and I am very grateful to Newcomb-Tulane College and the Newcomb College Institute whose grants funded this research.

Alumni in the News


June Murphy, '16

I interned with the legendary archives at the Archdiocese of New Orleans my senior year.  After graduation, I was hired to be part of a great team to research, develop, and curate a museum exhibit about the Sisters of the Holy Family and their foundress, the Venerable Henriette Delille. It was thrilling work that put everything I had learned about public history into concrete terms. I loved using everything I had learned about New Orleans and free women of color to make the exhibit tell stories in a responsible and thorough way. There is nothing like being in the presence of documents being used to canonize a person. The exhibit is at the Old Ursuline Convent until fall, and I'm currently assisting with another exhibit on the cathedral. 

Student Opportunities

 

Grants Opportunities

Interested in a summer research project?  Jump starting an honors thesis? Studying Abroad? Hoping to participate in a conference? Tulane offers a lot of funding opportunities and the History Department would love to support you.

Newcomb-Tulane College

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