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Grab your calendar and make plans to attend one or more events below. 

Click on each page to view additional information and/or to register.


PACT Webinars in Spanish / Seminarios web de PACT en español


Register Here
REGISTER HERE
Register Here

A Clinic is a designated appointment time to meet with your PACT Project Regional Coordinator. There are different ways your Regional Coordinator may assist you at an IEP Clinic. Some ways are: 

  • To learn what the ARD process or Section 504 process is like, 
  • To review your child’s IEP or 504 Plan, 
  • Help you determine what you want for your child and how to achieve it, 
  • Help you understand what your rights are under IDEA.

Call, text or email your Regional Coordinator to schedule your appointment!

Click here to find your Regional Coordinator.

MEET OUR PACT TEAM

Click on each name to learn more information about each team member.

Accessible & Assistive Technology Training

The Texas Governor's Committee on People with Disabilities provides learning modules on making Microsoft Office documents accessible to people with disabilities. Click HERE to access. 
If you or someone you know needs support now, 988 connects you with a trained crisis counselor who can help.  Simply calling or texting 988 or typing 988Lifeline.org will connect you to compassionate care & support for mental health-related distress.

#988Lifeline
Have you ever wondered what a postsecondary program for youth and young adults with disabilities is like? Please watch the two videos linked below that give insight into this experience.
Destination UGA : Navigating Campus with Down Syndrome
https://youtu.be/NTt7SYfLj1I 
Living the Dream: UT FUTURE Pilot Residential Program
Good Reads to Get Ready for Back to School
 

11 Back-to-School Tips for Parents of Children with Disabilities - HERE

Extracurricular Activities for Kids with Disabilities - HERE

10 Sensory Back-to-School Supplies - HERE

Things Every Parent of Kids with Special Needs Should Hear - HERE

Back-to-School Tips for Parents of Children with Special Needs - HERE

Play Is Important Work

We all want our children to thrive and succeed in school, with friends, and in life. Everyone wants that “magic bullet” that will lead to the success of our children in all aspects of life. Believe it or not, imaginative play is as close to that magic as families can find. 

The benefits of play are many and well documented. In the Academy of American Pediatrics  journal, Pediatrics, the author Kenneth Gisburg, MD, MSEd wrote, “Play is essential to development because it contributes to the cognitive, physical, social, and emotional well-being of children and youth. Play also offers an ideal opportunity for parents to engage fully with their children.”

The best play is between two or more people. Playing together with peers or family allows everyone to share and interact with each other. As adults, most of us have probably forgotten the joy in getting lost in the moment or doing something “silly” so let’s talk about how to get back to play.
  1. You don’t need fancy toys. Sometimes the simplest toys provide the most opportunities for language and motor development, such as think blocks, cars, animals, etc. Even items in nature (like sticks and rocks) can be playful; the interactive play is what’s important, not the items used.
  2. Be present. Put your phone away, turn off the notifications and be present with your child or children for 10, 15, or 30 minutes. You will be amazed by how much you can bond and share in those moments.
  3. Tradeoff between being the leader and following your child’s lead. When parents lead play, try to model simple language or routines (building a tower and knocking it down, feeding farm/zoo animals and putting them “night night,” etc). When you follow, allow your child to show you what they enjoy while you imitate what they do and what they say.
  4. Silly is good. Not all play needs to feel like a lesson; be silly and enjoy it. Make the cars crash, have the animals drive the train, etc. Being silly encourages flexible thinking, creativity, problem solving, and compromise.
  5. Make it physical. Create an obstacle course, have a dance party, try to jump on the trampoline together. Being physical increases motor skills, coordination, and opportunities to “try again.”
  6. Play a game. Game play is great at any age. For younger children, it teaches turn taking, sequencing, and how to accept defeat (even when it is no fun and hard). For older children, it is an opportunity to bond with family around a neutral activity, teaches problem-solving or logical thinking, and sparks great conversations.
All these play activities create bonding experiences that will enrich your relationship with your child. Having fun, making messes, and being silly all help them generate new language, strengthen motor skills, and create better social skills that will enrich their lives for a very long time.

If you are concerned about your child’s speech, language, or motor skills and/or would like to schedule an evaluation, please contact our team today at 817-479-7019. We would love to help!
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Copyright © June 2022 PRN PACT Project, All rights reserved.

Our mailing address is:
1331 Airport Freeway, Ste 303
Euless, TX 76040

The contents of this publication were developed under a grant from the US Department of Education, #H328M200043. However, those contents do not necessarily represent the policy of the US Department of Education, and you should not assume endorsement by the Federal Government.
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Copyright © August 2022 PRN PACT Project, All rights reserved.

Our mailing address is:
1331 Airport Freeway, Ste 303
Euless, TX 76040

The contents of this publication were developed under a grant from the US Department of Education, #H328M200043. However, those contents do not necessarily represent the policy of the US Department of Education, and you should not assume endorsement by the Federal Government.