Copy
Problems viewing this newsletter? View it in your browser >



May 26, 2011

Dear Advocate,

This update includes information on a special webinar—organized by Cervical Cancer Action (CCA) and AVAC—taking place on Thurusday, June 2, “Leveraging Advocacy Opportunities for Cervical Cancer at the United Nations High-Level Meeting on Non-communicable Diseases”. Click here to register for the webinar.

The CCA-AVAC webinar is an update on the processes underway to increase attention to and resources for non-communicable diseases. Speakers will address key activities to ensure that cervical cancer prevention and treatment are prioritized at the September 2011 United Nations General Assembly Special Session on Non-communicable Diseases, a critical opportunity for elevating attention to specific disease-related issues and priorities at a global level. The call will also discuss tools for advocacy, including the recently released CCA document Progress in Cervical Cancer Prevention: The Report Card.

Presenters and topics

  • Scott Wittet, CCA - Progress in cervical cancer prevention: findings from the CCA Report Card
  • Dr. Nuriye Ortalyi, United Nations Population Fund - The global burden of cervical cancer, and how we can use this opportunity to strengthen health services for adolescents and older women
  • Union for International Cancer Control (speaker to be determined) – The role of civil society in moving the agenda forward, specifically in relation to the opportunities presented by the High Level Meeting on Non-communicable Diseases
  • Dr. Karen Sealey, Pan American Health Organization - The UN High Level Meeting and other opportunities for increasing resources for cervical cancer; a call-to-action
  • Moderator: Alessandra Durstine, American Cancer Society

Webinar details:

Thursday, June 2, 2011
10–11:30 AM US Eastern time (visit www.timeanddate.com to confirm the time in your area)

Click here to register for the webinar. Please send any questions you have in advance to avac@avac.org.

Research has shown that HIV-positive women are at greater risk for HPV infection and are more likely to be infected with multiple HPV strains than HIV-negative women. Given that adolescent girls are a key target population for both HPV vaccine and a potential AIDS vaccine, it is critical to track and learn from HPV vaccine introduction efforts.

Progress in Cervical Cancer Prevention: The CCA Report Card is available for download at avac.org/hpv. To order hard copies and find out more about Cervical Cancer Action, visit www.cervicalcanceraction.org.

Best,
AVAC


Forward This IssueDo you know someone who might be interested in receiving this newsletter?
Forward > 


Unsubscribe You're receiving this because you signed up for our newsletter. Not interested any longer?
Unsubscribe > 


Contact Us T: +1 212 796 6423
E: avac@avac.org

W: www.avac.org