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September 2016 
News and Events

Contents


01) BCSR's 2016-17 Season of Lectures and Events
02) September 27th | How Does Theology Speak? A New Perspective on Martin Luther's Nova Lingua | Andrea Vestrucci
03) October 6 | European Moments in the Making of Islam’s “Image Problem” | Finbarr Barry Flood


All events are free and open to the public.
For more information, visit
bcsr.berkeley.edu.

 
01) BCSR's 2016-17 Season of Lectures and Events

BCSR is pleased to announce its 2016-17 program of public lectures and events. Scholars from a wide range of backgrounds will address diverse topics in religion, from the relations between European conceptions of Islam and Islamic iconoclasm, to Martin Luther’s vision of the language of theology, to an exploration of belief in religious and secular contexts in premodern China. Continuing from last year, Theology and East Asian Traditions presents Translating Religion and Theology in Europe and Asia: East to West, part two of a two-year program examining the character and impact of religious discourse between eastern and western cultures.


All events are free and open to the public. For more information, please visit bcsr.berkeley.edu
 
02) September 27 | How Does Theology Speak? A New Perspective on Martin Luther's Nova Lingua | Andrea Vestrucci

How Does Theology Speak? A New Perspective on Martin Luther's Nova Lingua
Andrea Vestrucci, Researcher, Éric Weil Institute, University of Lille, France
Tuesday, September 27, 5-7 pm
3401 Dwinelle Hall, UC Berkeley


Against Sorbonne theologians, Luther claimed that theology has to speak a different language from philosophy, a nova lingua. What is the nature, and what are the conditions, of this lingua? Contemporary scholarship is divided into two positions, referring the specificity of theological language either to the semantics (and specifically to the analogy), or to the formal structure (as new syllogistic inference). Vestrucci’s presentation aims to overcome this dichotomy on both historical and theoretical levels, via a specific reference to the famous Luther/Erasmus clash on the liberum arbitrium. This analysis leads to a discussion on the relationship between human language and divine revelation. As close to the fifth centennial of the Reformation as we are, Luther’s thought has never been more actual.
 
03) October 6 | European Moments in the Making of Islam's "Image Problem" | Finbarr Barry Flood

 

European Moments in the Making of Islam's "Image Problem"
Finbarr Barry Flood, Professor of the Humanities, New York University
Thursday, October 6, 5-7pm
Geballe Room, 220 Stephens Hall, UC Berkeley


The image of Islam in the West has been consistently informed by the idea that Islam fosters distinctive attitudes towards the image. Recent controversies about Islam, aniconism and iconoclasm are typical in this respect, often taking the idea of an Islamic Bilderverbot (image prohibition) as a given. Seen from the perspective of the longue durée, however, the idea of an image problem is only partly informed by knowledge or understanding of beliefs and practices that are internal to Islam. Representations of Islam produced by non-Muslims over more than a millennium have been no less important to the perception, perhaps even creation, of an Islamic Bilderverbot. This persistent idea should, therefore, be analyzed not only in light of the tenets of Islam, but also as an aspect of European intellectual history. Doing so sheds light upon the current reinvestment of the image as a site for the construction of difference in debates about Islam, secularism and European identity.
 
By connecting scholars, students, and the global community, the Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion (BCSR) fosters critical and creative scholarship on religion and activates this scholarship for students and the public at large.

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