Thursday March 14th
VIRTUAL GLOBAL GATHERING  VIA ZOOM
BERRY FORUM CONTEMPLATIVE ECOLOGISTS CIRCLE

View this email in your browser

Join us to reflect on the richness and challenge of the selected teaching from the legacy of Thomas Berry,
Spiritual Master of the Ecozoic Age.

For our March 14th gathering, we begin our reflection on the rich and challenging essay by Thomas Berry

“Catching the Power of the Wind“

A Statement on the Occasion of the
Thirtieth Anniversary of the United Nations at the Spiritual Summit Conference.  
October 24, 1975.
This essay can be found at ThomasBerry.org in Publications/Essays
Click below to open document or paste into your search engine:

http://thomasberry.org/publications-and-media/catching-the-power-of-the-wind

For your convenience, the section for reflection is noted below.

AS WE EXPERIMENT WITH OPPORTUNITIES FOR ENGAGEMENT, DURING THE REMAINDER OF THE WINTER WE WILL GATHER  VIRTUALLY VIA ZOOM
IT'S FREE AND EASY, WILL CONSERVE ENERGY DURING THESE WINTER MONTHS AND ALLOW US TO ENLARGE OUR CIRCLE TO THOSE AFAR

HOW TO ACCESS:  
Time: Thursday, March 14, 2019 7:00 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada)
Topic: Berry Forum Contemplative Circle

Join Zoom Meeting
https://zoom.us/j/251035952

One tap mobile
+19292056099,,251035952# US (New York)
+16699006833,,251035952# US (San Jose)

Dial by your location
        +1 929 205 6099 US (New York)
        +1 669 900 6833 US (San Jose)
Meeting ID: 251 035 952
Find your local number: https://zoom.us/u/azUWp6a0R

These monthly invitations are sent with a selection from Thomas Berry's writings to inspire our shared silence and dialogue, and to foster The Great Work of cultivating a community of contemplative ecologists as a feature of our ecozoic vocation.  Please invite your friends and spread the word.  

Our Contemplative Ecologists Circle has gone global!

Future Contemplative Ecologists Circles:
Thursday, April 11, 2019
Thursday, May 9, 2019

 

Thomas Berry: Evening Thoughts  
San Francisco: Sierra Club Books, 2006

On this thirtieth anniversary of the founding of the United Nations we wish to indicate to you our esteem for the work you have accomplished. For thirty years this body has carried within itself many of the larger hopes and destinies of humankind. We remember the moment, some thirty years ago, when this body first assembled after a period of tragedy and devastation on a scale that humans had never witnessed before. To heal this devastation and assist in guiding humankind into a better future the United Nations with its related agencies set itself to work. To fulfill its high purposes this space outside of all nations was set up to provide a context in which all can meet on equal terms no matter how tense the human situation may be.

We come here because we too feel a responsibility for the human community. To preserve and develop a human quality of life is the common responsibility of us all. It is not fitting that those concerned with the various aspects of the human be alienated from each other. Both you and ourselves represent forces too profound and aim at objectives too significant for either of us to succeed completely without the assistance of the other. The urgency of our work impels us to get on with our common task lest a new period of disaster erupt over the Earth.

To expect your work to succeed by utopian standards would not be fair to your work at this highest and most complicated level of human affairs. But to be satisfied with what has so far been achieved would be a betrayal of the human venture that urges us to press onward lest the ever-threatening world situation engulf the human venture once again in another inhuman swirl of global violence. This might result from the incapacity of the human community to adjust to its own inner tensions or from an incapacity of adjusting to the ecological demands of the Earth system itself.

Here the human community gathers on a comprehensive scale, human as creator and destroyer, human as peacemaker and as antagonist, human as the finest production of the Earth and as the greatest threat to the Earth. These antagonisms, dangerous as they are in any period of history, are a thousand fold more threatening at this time because of the new range of power that is available to the nations. Through space exploration and nuclear technology, the acceleration of movement and communication, new instruments of creativity and destruction have evolved. At the same time poverty, hunger and starvation have increased for millions of people throughout the world. From a large planet of overwhelming magnitude, unlimited resources and endless mystery, the Earth has suddenly become a small planet, thoroughly explored, limited in resources, and reduced in mystery.

According to this new scale of measurement the human community is seen as too large for such a small planet. From this there arises both a sense of common destiny and a feeling of rivalry for possession. Excessive population, increasing per capita energy consumption, group rivalries for land; all of these aggravate the capacity of individuals and peoples to live comfortably with each other. At the same time the sense of a common home, a common mode of being, a common origin from the Earth, a common destiny, and a common heritage is increasing. It is precisely these perils and this newly emerging consciousness that have brought about this assembly and that now bring about this meeting between ourselves. Our challenge is to turn our perils into opportunities and to bring about an intensification of life rather than a turning of life against itself.

Copyright © *|2019|* *|Thomas Berry Forum for Ecological Dialogue*, All rights reserved.
Our mailing address is:

kdeignan@iona.edu

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update
your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.