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Hawaii Invasive Species Council Communication

Coconut Rhinoceros Beetle (CRB)
Response Update

Oryctes rhinoceros
male (Aubrey Moore, University of Guam)

Coconut Rhinoceros Beetle (CRB), an invasive pest, was detected Dec. 23, 2013 at Joint Base Pearl Harbor – Hickam (JBPHH) on coconut trees.  A joint effort between USDA, UH at Manoa, U.S. Navy, HDOA and other partners has mobilized and an Incident Command System (ICS) has been established to respond to this pest emergency.

Please find the latest update below or click to view/download as a PDF:
 
Contact Randy Bartlett, CRB Response Liaison Officer, with any questions related to this update, by emailing Randal.T.Bartlett@hawaii.gov, or by calling 808-832-0585

*CRB Response Updates will be sent to the full HISC Listserv, to opt-out of the updates, please respond to this email indicating you do not wish to receive them.

For more information, click on the links below:

December 27, 2015 – January 9, 2016
 
  • Detections
    • On Base (All DOD property on Oʻahu; including Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam (JBPH-HI))
      • 13 adults/0 larvae detected of 2263 adults/1135 larvae total detected since 12/23/2013.
    • Off Base:
      • 5 adults/0 larvae detected of 962 adults total detected since 12/23/2013.
  • Surveillance
    • A tree survey is still in progress on JBPH-HI with minimal damaged observed in officers’ housing area.
    • Investigation into possible breeding sites continues within established buffer zones.
    • Over 2,700 CRB traps are currently in active service on Oʻahu.
  • Mitigation
    • A social media campaign to build public awareness was launched by the Hawaiʻi Invasive Species Council (HISC) on Instagram (@HISC808).
  • Research
    • A CRB research center is being prepared at UH Manoa with an anticipated completion date of February, 2016. Site inspections and permits must be obtained before it can be used.
    • Research is still underway to better understand the cyclic nature of weekly, monthly, and annual trap capture rates.
  • Beetle Fact
    • Damage: Death of the palm occurs when the beetle bores down to the meristematic tissue which can destroy the growing point. This is more likely to occur in young palms with small crowns (Catley, 1969).
 
This report uses the best information available at the time of writing and is not an official record of the project. Its purpose is to update partner agencies and concerned individuals about project progress. Questions regarding information in the report can be addressed by calling the project command post at (808) 832-0585. Mahalo.
DAVID IGE
GOVERNOR OF HAWAII
 
SHAN TSUTSUI
LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR
 


VOTING MEMBERS
 
SUZANNE CASE
DEPARTMENT OF LAND & NATURAL RESOURCES
 
SCOTT ENRIGHT
DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
 
KEITH KAWAOKA, D.Env.
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH
 
MARIA GALLO, PhD
UNIVERSITY OF HAWAI‘I
 
LEO ASUNCION
DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS, ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT & TOURISM, OFFICE OF PLANNING
 
DAVID RODRIGUEZ
DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION
 Your HISC Support Team:

Joshua Atwood, HISC Program Supervisor: 808.587.4154  or Joshua.P.Atwood@hawaii.gov

Randy Bartlett, HISC Interagency Coordinator: 808.870.6443 or Randal.T.Bartlett@hawaii.gov

John-Carl Watson, HISC Planner: 808.587.4185 or John-Carl.R.Watson@hawaii.gov

Copyright © 2016 Hawaii Invasive Species Council, All rights reserved.
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