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27 August 2015
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How did a sleepy rural community become the stork capital of North Macedonia? We meet the White Storks that live alongside local people, and discover how one woman’s love of birds inspired an entire movement.
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Under the sweltering Cambodian sun, a Lesser Adjutant Leptoptilos javanicus wades through the freshwater swamps of the Tonle Sap Great Lake. Within Tonle Sap lies Stung Sen, a unique wetland characterised by old-growth forest that undergoes seasonal flooding. Nearby, low-stature shrubland and natural grassland provide crucial foraging grounds for the Lesser Adjutant.

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The European Turle-dove is one of seven flagship birds in our Flight for Survival campaign to raise awareness of the scope and scale of the illegal killing of migratory birds.

For thousands of years, European Turtle-doves have inspired humanity, serving as symbols of love, fidelity and new life. In Roman mythology, the bird was sacred to Demeter, Goddess of the harvest and fertility; in modern days, in Cockney rhyming slang, the words ‘turtle dove’ are used to mean ‘love’.

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Today’s young people are going to be dealing with some of the biggest conservation challenges the planet has experienced – but we think they’re up to the task. That’s why we give up-and-coming conservationists the support they need to kick-start their careers through BirdLife Young Conservation Leaders (YCL) and the Conservation Leadership Programme (CLP).

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A new paper published in the journal Science criticizes current incentives for governments to create protected areas, and calls for a new approach to encourage nations to safeguard biodiversity.

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