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Welcome to SREB's Educator Effectiveness newsletter. With updates on teacher preparation, hiring, professional development, evaluation and compensation, we aim to keep you informed about educator effectiveness research, issues and news.

February 17, 2014
Back from the Institute for Emerging Issues Forum

By Andy Baxter, SREB vice president, Educator Effectiveness
 
I had the good fortune of spending two fascinating days – February 10-11 – in Raleigh, North Carolina, at an Institute for Emerging Issues event. The Institute works “to ensure North Carolina’s future competitiveness” by bringing together thought leaders and community members on issues like education, the environment, the economy and health.
 
The theme was “Teachers and the Great Economic Debate.” The experience was a nexus of great ideas, dynamic attendees and meaningful discussion. In fact, I believe the Institute’s model could be an effective one for states as they address teacher effectiveness issues.
 
Here are just a few reasons why:
  • The scale and scope of the participants: 1,300 participants from North Carolina who were students, teachers, principals, district officials, researchers, journalists, state school board members and legislators. They represented government, business and nonprofits. 
  • The significant presence of teachers: 300 of the attendees were educators from 97 of North Carolina’s 100 counties.
  • The willingness to embrace widely diverging points of view: Gov. Bill Haslam of Tennessee and education policy analyst Diane Ravitch both gave thoughtful presentations.
  • The juncture of multiple disciplines – economics, psychology, applied behavioral science, political science, and others – to shed light on a complicated policy issue.
  • The combination of international, national and local experts: From Pasi Sahlberg of Finland, Rick Hess (American Enterprise Institute) and John Merrow (PBS) to North Carolina's Helen Ladd (Duke), Bryan Hassel (Public Impact) and Victor Dzau (Duke University Health System). See the full roster here.  
It was a powerful event.  I’m certain Anita Brown-Graham and her colleagues at the Institute for Emerging Issues would be willing to share their experience with other states interested in trying something similar.  To learn more about The Institute for Emerging Issues Forum, visit http://iei.ncsu.edu/emerging-issues/teachers-great-economic-debate/.  To review reactions from attendees, search on Twitter for #EIF2014.
 
If you are in an SREB state and would like to put on a similar event, we would welcome the opportunity to collaborate. Contact me at Andy.Baxter@sreb.org.

 

What Are You Reading?

I'm always browsing the Web for interesting articles, trending topics and engaging online conversations. Whether it's a new formal report, a just-published article or a conversation-starting blog post, I'd love to learn what's got your attention. Please share links and material with me at Andy.Baxter@sreb.org.

State of the States

In recent 2014 State of the State addresses in SREB states, governors proposed policy changes related to educator effectiveness in particular, focusing on teacher pay, preparation and hiring.

Career-Tech Webinar

The Center on Great Teachers and Leaders, in partnership with other groups, is leading a webinar titled "Supporting 21st Century Educators: How States Are Promoting Career and Technical Educator Effectiveness" on March 7 from 2-3:30 p.m. ET. See more details and register here.

Teaching Common Core State Standards

SREB is developing a proposal for a 4-to-5-year project to help instructional leaders provide feedback to teachers. The goals are increased student learning as measured by the Common Core State Standards, using the Literacy Design Collaborative and Mathematics Design Collaborative.
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