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Investigating the ecological impacts of wildfires on wildlife and native ecosystems

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PACIFIC BIODIVERSITY INSTITUTE

Investigating the ecological impacts of wildfires on wildlife and native ecosystems

September 15, 2015

This summer, visiting scientist Sara Emerson and conservation science intern Kristina Bartowitz are working closely with PBI staff investigating the impact of recent wildfires on wildlife and ecosystem health. They are also assisting Washington Dept. of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) and PBI with a state-wide assessment of the population status of the threatened western gray squirrel.

 

Sara Emerson came to PBI from the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Israel, where she was a Fulbright Postdoctoral Scholar. She has a Ph.D. in ecology and evolution. Sara has taught at several universities and studied plant-animal interactions involving numerous animals around the world.
 

 

Kristina Bartowitz recently finished her M.S. in Conservation Biology and Sustainable Development at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She has studied prairies, orchids, invasive plants, birds, small mammals, and amphibians in Wisconsin, Costa Rica, Panama and Gabon.
 

You can join Sara, Kristina, PBI staff and other volunteers as they investigate the ecological impacts of wildfires on wildlife and their habitat. We are inviting volunteers to join us during the remainder of the 2015 field season. There are citizen science opportunities to gather data on (and learn about) forests, native plants, birds, and mammals. Training will be provided by our well-qualified biologists. If you would like to help, please call 509-996-2490 or email volunteer@pacificbio.org.

If you don't have time to volunteer, consider making a financial gift to support this important work that enables young scientists to become proficient in advancing wildlife conservation. This research has been made possible by small grants and donations from the Charlotte Martin Foundation, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), the Craig and Jean Olson Fund, the PBI Special Projects Fund and generous individuals like you. If you, or your organization, are interested in sponsoring this research, we can put your gift directly to work. Please contact us today, or donate securely online.

Volunteers Juliet Rhodes and D. Eric Harlow, and PBI conservation biologist Katrina Fisk surveying for birds in Pipestone Canyon, which burned in 2014.

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