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Health Enewsletter November 2016

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"Doc, what can you do about my eczema?"
Expiration dates: Important!
Arthritis Walk June 4th 2016
Jingle Bell Run of the Arthritis Foundation: Saturday November 12th 2016

Rheumatology and Dermatology Associates
8143 Walnut Grove Road
Cordova TN 38018
1-901-753-0168; Rheuderm@Comcast.net
 

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Dr. George
Woodbury and Dr. Cathy Chapman
Rheumatology and Dermatology Associates
8143 Walnut Grove Road
Cordova, TN 38018
 (901) 753-0168
Rheuderm@comcast.net
 

 
 
Dr. Woodbury and a patient compare notes about her itching. We try to help patients function better and sleep better at night by figuring out what trigger factors are at play—perhaps a soap that’s too drying, an irritating laundry detergent, or even a preservative or fragrance chemical to which one is allergic.  We endeavor to create a collaborative relationship between the medical team and the patient in formulating a care plan.

"Doc, I have eczema. What can you do to help me?"
If you or a family member have eczema, consider getting the condition evaluated, or reevaluated. Don't itch in silence! 
Eczema, or atopic dermatitis, is one of the most common skin problems in the United States. It present with an itchy rash on the arms, legs, neck, and/or face. It may be genetic, i.e. running in families along with asthma, hay fever, and food allergists. It can also be brought on by an allergy to a preservative or fragrance. Eczema is often managed effectively with an combination of topical and systemic (by mouth) medications so that the itching and dryness of the skin does not interfere with daily functions like going to school or working.
At times, a dermatologist will take a skin test called a biopsy to check whether the condition really is eczema, or perhaps a completely separate condition, like dermatitis herpetiformis, a type of wheat protein sensitivity. Sometimes the itchy rash is actually due to a contact dermatitis, to a preservative, fragrance, component of latex, or dye.
A biopsy involves having a small piece of skin taken off surgically under a shot of local anesthetic, and then sent in to be studied by the laboratory.
Another option is a fungal culture—involving a scraping that can be sent into the lab to find out whether the rash is coming from a yard or gymn fungus. A test called allergy patch testing can also help us. We look for sensitivity to common trigger chemicals, including preservatives, fragrances, or components of latex. George Woodbury Jr. M.D.—11/08/2016
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The photo below shows the back of a patient who reported for allergy patch testing, a test which requires 4 appointments over 8 days. You will note in the photograph that one area reacted with red bumps to the a particular patch, in particular to a metal called cobalt, which is a frequent ingredient in costume jewelry, This patient also reacted vigorously to the preservative in her shampoo, iodopropynyl butyl carbonate. She also reacted to a common fragrance called jasmine, as well as acrylic adhesives.  Now she knows what chemicals to avoid.


 



 The expiration date that’s crimped into the base of the tube of your prescriptions is quite important. Note that the three creams brought in by this patient were all expired: the dates on the tubes are old. When the cream is expired, it’s best to avoid using it and to come in for a follow-up appointment. 
 
Emily Woodbury designed our practice's grassroots logo to illustrate
that people benefit most when patients and healthcare personnel work together in a team-wise approach. Everything comes together in a big circle.

Arthritis Walk: June 4th 2016
and the Jingle Bell Run, Saturday November 12th 2016.

Rheumatology and Dermatology staff, family, and patient activists joined forces
Saturday June 4th 2016, at Shelby Farms, Memphis, TN, to demonstrate support for arthritis research, with 3 and 5 kilometer walks, in support of the Arthritis Foundation, as part of the Walk to Cure Athritis.


Rheumatology and Dermatology Medical Assistants Vicki and Shirley would like you to join our efforts to promote arthritis research!


The Jingle Bell Run—the Arthritis Foundation’s winter fundraiser—is scheduled for Saturday November 12th 2016.
Online Registration ends on Friday, November 11th 2016 at 8:00 p.m.
Day of Registration: 8:45 a.m. to 9:45 a.m. Fee: $35.00. Contact Michelle Dooner, mdooner@arthritis.org or call 901-322-1517.



 
 

For questions, comments, or if you would like to
be added to our email list, please email “purplhealth@yahoo.com”or call 1-901-753-0168.
George Woodbury Jr. M.D. (11/08/2016)

 
 






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Rheumatology & Dermatology Assoc, PC. · 8143 Walnut Grove Rd · Memphis, TN 38018 · USA