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          10 stories we've enjoyed this week      

Illustration by Aorists - Work With Her
Hi All,

There's a new episode of A Brief History of Stuff, the podcast we make with the Science Museum, waiting for your ears. In this episode Nihal learns about how the first vacuum cleaner was invented, why we should call them Spanglers not Hoovers, how the spring clean began and what housework can tell us about the world around us. Subscribe wherever you get your pods. If you've been thinking about developing your own podcast format, do get in touch

Thanks and inspiration this week go to Russell Davies, Michael Newberry and Amy NcNichol.

Have a fantastic weekend,

Hugh.
 
The Short Story
A Brief History of Netflix Personalisation 
(20 x 1 min reads)

Who Hasn't Felt Like Dorothy Parker After She Missed Her Deadline?
(1 min read)

The 25 Most Influential Movie Scenes of the Last 25 Years
(list)

Why Documentaries Will Benefit From Breaking Away From the Three Act Structure of Storytelling
(4 min read)

New York City Wakes Up - Interactive Photo Story
(5 min read)

Why Your Roadmap Should Have a 'Not Doing' Section
(2 min read)

How a Pop-Up Magazine Pivoted to (Even More) Experimental Storytelling
(3 min read)

My Google Search History: a Frank Interrogation
(10 min read)

Inside No. 9 Takes on Fandoms and the Creator/Fan Relationship
(30 min watch)

When Traffic Lights First Came to London, Disaster Ensued
(4 min read)
A vacuum cleaner with a long nozzel and a badge with 'Hoover' written on it

How can we help you?

Storythings is a strategy and content company based in Brighton and London. We'd love to help you with some creative and bold ideas.

Here's 3 reasons to get in touch

1. You want to talk to us about content production: podcasts, videos, animations, illustrations, editorial. 

2. You want to talk to us about content strategy or format development.

3. You want to create a brand or an identity that makes it easier to communicate your message.


We do other things too. We're very friendly and always enjoy meeting people, so get in touch

 
The Full Story
A Brief History of Netflix Personalisation 
If, like us, you're fascinated by how organisations look at audience attention to deliver better services, you must read this. In twenty years, Netflix has gone from members choosing 2% of the movies it suggests to 80% today. In the early days, a member would explore hundreds of titles before finding something they liked. Today most members look at forty choices before they hit the 'play' button. In the future, Netflix hopes to play that one choice that’s 'just right' for you with no browsing or choice required. This brief history is broken down into one-minute reads for each year of Netflix's history.
(20 x 1 min reads)

Who Hasn't Felt Like Dorothy Parker After She Missed Her Deadline?
This telegram Dorothy Parker sent to her editor after missing a deadline features two of the best lines ever written about the dread of missing a deadline and the struggle of turning thoughts into words. So good.
(1 min read)


Why Documentaries Will Benefit From Breaking Away From the Three-Act Structure of Storytelling
A good story, based around the well-used three-act structure, has been the hot commodity of nonfiction films in recent years – but they only give viewers the power to identify with their subjects rather than understand them. Simran Hans thinks its time for a change and highlights a collection of new documentaries that are breaking the mold, playing with the linear narrative structure and using juxtapositions in an effort to find new ways of connecting with protagonists. 
(4 min read)

The 25 Most Influential Movie Scenes of the Last 25 Years
Sometimes, all it takes is a single scene to change moviemaking for good. Jeff Bridges, Nancy Meyers, Tom Hanks, Jordan Peele, Sofia Coppola, and more, talk about their own classic scenes from the list. I like the comparison Keanu Reeves made about how the techniques used in the Shooting Neo scene are now commonly used in how sport is shot. 
(list)

New York City Wakes Up - Interactive Photo Story
This is really nice. Not just the photos, but the creative approach to telling a photo story over a month. With the vaccination rate soaring and hospitalisations plummeting, the lockdown mind-set evaporated, and New York City surged back to life. The New York Times Magazine documented this reawakening through the eyes of 15 photographers, all of them age 25 or younger. For all 31 days of May, they fanned out around the city to capture the hope and excitement, the release of pent-up social energy — but also the anxiety and uncertainty about what might happen next.
(5 min read)

Why Your Roadmap Should Have a 'Not Doing' Section
A good, short, read from the smart people at Public Digital on why you need a 'Not Doing' section on your company roadmap and how good leadership empowers freedom by saying 'no' rather than always saying 'yes'. 
(2 min read)


How a Pop-Up Magazine Pivoted to (Even More) Experimental Storytelling
When the theatres shut last year, Pop-Up Magazine, the publication known for its on-stage renditions of original magazine stories that rethought the performance of storytelling, had to rethink how it would continue. The combination of new relationships with partners, new ways of convening audiences, and new membership models kept the publication alive. 
(3 min read)


My Google Search History: a Frank Interrogation
This is a great format. Slate writer, Ashley Feinberg, looks at unedited Google search histories of various guests and asks them probing, deeply uncomfortable questions about the things they seek out when no one’s looking. In the interest of fairness, Ashley kicks off the series by inviting Wired senior writer Kate Knibbs to pore through her own search history. Excellent stuff. 
(10 min read)


Inside No. 9 Takes on Fandoms and the Creator/Fan Relationship
If you are in a fandom, or read fanfiction, there is a good chance you will love, or hate, the Simon Says episode of the brilliant Inside No. 9. The episode is based around a writer and fan who believes the final episode of a series wasn't satisfying and needs a re-write. Sounds familiar?
(30 min watch)


When Traffic Lights First Came to London, Disaster Ensued
Interesting story on the rise, and fall, of the first traffic light in London which caused so much chaos it was a couple of decades before more lights were added to the streets. 
(5 min read)
We hope you've enjoyed this week's newsletter. I'm sure some of your friends would love to read it. Sharing it would be really appreciated. If you've received this from a friend you can subscribe here and get it direct to your inbox every Friday.

Thanks for reading and see you all next week,

Hugh, Matt, Anjali and the team at Storythings
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