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Issue #3: The Health Care Industry in Peel and Halton Regions
October 15, 2013

Between 2006 and 2011, employment in the Health Care and Social Assistance industry grew by 12.6% in Ontario.1 With this growth, it’s important to determine the industry’s trends in Peel and Halton Regions including what kinds of jobs are available and which employers to seek out.
 
EMPLOYMENT IN HEALTH CARE INDUSTRIES IN PEEL AND HALTON REGIONS
The increase in the number of residents employed in Health Care and Social Assistance has been high across all regions of Ontario including Peel and Halton. However, employment in this industry, at the local level, still makes up a lower proportion of all employment compared to the province as a whole.
 
Table 1: Employment in Health Care and Social Assistance, Peel, Halton and Ontario, 2006 and 2011
  ONTARIO PEEL HALTON
% CHANGE IN EMPLOYMENT, 2006 TO 2011 12.6% 20.3% 18.1%
% OF ALL EMPLOYMENT, 2011 10.6% 7.8% 8.5%
INDUSTRY RANK BY NUMBER OF EMPLOYED 2nd 5th 4th
 
Thus, in comparison, employment among Peel and Halton residents in Health Care and Social Assistance grew at a much faster rate compared to the rest of the province, yet as a total share of all employment, this industry makes up a smaller proportion of the local workforce and ranks only 5th among Peel residents and 4th among Halton residents; this in comparison to being the second largest employer of residents in Ontario.
 
EMPLOYMENT IN HEALTH CARE SUBSECTORS
The Health Care and Social Assistance industry is made up of four subsectors (below are the NAICS2 codes assigned to each industry and its categories):
 
62 Health Care and Social Assistance
  • 621 Ambulatory health care services (offices of health care practitioners and health services provided to walk-in patients)
  • 622 Hospitals (health services to in-patients)
  • 623 Nursing and residential care facilities (establishments providing residential care with health and social services)
  • 624 Social assistance (establishments providing a wide array of social services, from counselling to serving the elderly or the disabled, from community food and housing to child daycare)
However, this report focuses on the Health Care subsectors and excludes Social Assistance.
 
The following table illustrates growth in employment between 2006 and 2011 among Peel and Halton residents across different components of the health care industry and compares it to the Ontario averages. It is important to note that this reflects what jobs Peel and Halton residents work in, but does not define what jobs exist in Peel or Halton; residents may also commute outside their local region for work. Nevertheless, these figures do suggest growth trends among these industries.
 
Table 2: Rate of growth in employment, health care subsectors, Peel, Halton and Ontario, 2006-2011; and share of health care sector employment, Ontario, 2011
  ONTARIO PEEL HALTON SHARE
62 Health care and social assistance 13% 20% 18% 100%
  621 Ambulatory health care services 18% 21% 24% 39%
    6211 Offices of physicians 19% 23% 23% 9%
    6212 Offices of dentists 9% 11% 29% 8%
    6213 Offices of other health practitioners 50% 67% 30% 9%
    6214 Out-patients care centres 10% 3% 19% 5%
    6215 Medical and diagnostic laboratories 6% 3% 16% 2%
    6216 Home health care services 7% 6% 20% 4%
    6219 Other ambulatory health care services 3% 14% -11% 2%
  622 Hospitals 7% 16% 10% 37%
  623 Nursing and residential care facilities 18% 32% 12% 24%
 
By and large, one subsector stands out for its rate of growth in Ontario as well as in Peel and Halton: “Offices of other health practitioners.” This category includes offices of health care practitioners other than physicians and dentists and includes: mental health practitioners; optometrists; chiropractors; audiologists; and physical, occupational and speech therapists. Otherwise, in Ontario, ambulatory health care services and nursing and residential care facilities grew at a faster rate (both at 18%), compared to hospitals (7%).
 
The last column shows the distribution of all employment in the health care sector by each subsector in Ontario in 2011. Perhaps surprisingly, more people work in ambulatory facilities than in hospitals, although the share is almost even. For every five people employed in the health care industry, two work in ambulatory services, two work in hospitals, and one works in nursing and residential care facilities.
 
EMPLOYMENT IN HEALTH CARE OCCUPATIONS
Employment in the health care industry is not limited to health care occupations even though that is a big part of it. And the proportion of health care occupations varies by subsector.
 
The following table breaks down occupations in several general and a few specific occupation categories for both Peel and Halton. The data comes from the 2006 census where we have occupations cross-tabulated by industry. There is no reason to think that these proportions have changed drastically although there have been some smaller changes. The point is to illustrate the mix of occupations and how these vary by industry subcategory.
 
Table 3: Breakdown of select occupations by health care subsectors, Peel and Halton, 2006
  PEEL HALTON
ALL HEALTH CARE Ambulatory Hospitals Residential care ALL HEALTH CARE Ambulatory Hospitals Residential care
Nurses 18% 5% 42% 15% 17% 7% 37% 13%
Other professional health occupations (physicians, therapists) 14% 21% 10% 2% 14% 21% 10% 2%
 Technical health occupations (technologists and technicians) 14% 19% 11% 4% 11% 16% 13% 3%
Assisting health occupations (nurse’s aides, dental assistants) 14% 11% 6% 35% 15% 10% 7% 32%
ALL HEALTH OCCUPATIONS 60% 56% 69% 55% 57% 56% 64% 50%
Clerical occupations (office clerks and receptionists) 12% 17% 9% 5% 11% 14% 12% 5%
Skilled administrative occupations (administrative officers, secretaries) 9% 14% 4% 2% 8% 15% 4% 2%
Social service occupations (social workers and psychologists) 5% 4% 5% 9% 8% 7% 4% 12%
Kitchen helpers and related 2% 0% 1% 9% 3% 0% 3% 8%
Light duty cleaners 2% 0% 3% 4% 2% 0% 3% 5%
Janitors and caretakers 1% 0% 1% 2% 1% 0% 0% 2%
ALL SELECT OCCUPATIONS 91% 91% 92% 87% 90% 93% 90% 84%
 
All health occupations make up roughly 60% of all jobs in the health care industry and even more so in hospitals where they make up roughly two-thirds of all jobs; residential care facilities has a share closer to half.
 
The health care industry offers various clerical and administrative positions especially among ambulatory services and hospitals, as well as a range of entry-level service jobs among residential care facilities and hospitals.
 
Together, these nine occupation categories, a mix of health care, administrative and service sector occupations, make up roughly 90% of employment in the health care industry.
 
EMPLOYERS IN THE HEALTH CARE INDUSTRY IN PEEL AND HALTON
Statistics Canada’s Canadian Business Pattern data provides figures for the precise number of employers present in Peel and Halton Regions. The following tables offer the data for different time points between December 2008 and June 2013 for the three subsectors in the health care industry.
 
Table 4: Number of employers, ambulatory services, Peel and Halton, 2008-2013
 
 
 
 
 
NUMBER OF EMPLOYERS
 
PEEL   HALTON
0 1-4 5-19 20-99 100+ 0 1-4 5-19 20-99 100+
December 2008 417 1074 669 53 12 365 643 352 24 3
June 2009 419 1077 674 49 12 355 643 364 20 3
June 2010 522 1114 696 47 13 397 686 351 25 2
December 2010 614 1159 684 59 11 491 697 365 25 2
June 2011 638 1159 705 62 11 499 718 368 24 2
June 2012 667 1213 720 58 16 515 765 364 26 1
June 2013 1056 1454 773 69 15 748 994 396 28 3
RATIO
December 2008 100 100 100 100 100   100 100 100 100 100
June 2009 101 100 101 93 100 97 100 103 83 100
June 2010 125 104 104 89 108 109 107 100 104 67
December 2010 147 108 102 111 92 135 108 104 104 67
June 2011 153 108 105 117 92 137 112 105 100 67
June 2012 160 113 108 109 133 141 119 103 108 33
June 2013 253 135 116 130 125 205 155 113 117 100
 
Ambulatory services. Table 4 provides the actual number of employers in the ambulatory services subsector, by different employee sizes, for Peel and Halton. The top set of figures provides the actual number. The bottom set of figures, entitled RATIO, compares the number of employers to what existed in December 2008, assigning that base figure a value of 100, and every other figure in the column the ratio in relation to 100. Thus, an entry of 200 would indicate the total number of employers in that size category had doubled since December 2008.
 
It is clear that ambulatory services are made up of a very, very large number of very small establishments. Peel has considerably more such establishments than Halton and the number of such establishments has been increasing faster in Peel than in Halton. For example, the number of firms with no employees has grown 2.5 times in Peel compared to 2 times in Halton (253 versus 205). The number of firms with 100 or more employers has grown 1.25 times in Peel while it has not changed in Halton over this period (125 versus 100).
 
Table 5: Number of employers, hospitals, Peel and Halton, 2008-2013
 
 
 
 
 
NUMBER OF EMPLOYERS
 
PEEL   HALTON
0 1-4 5-19 20-99 100+ 0 1-4 5-19 20-99 100+
December 2008 1 0 0 0 3 2 1 1 1 4
June 2009 1 0 0 1 3 2 1 1 1 4
June 2010 1 0 0 1 2 2 1 1 1 4
December 2010 1 0 0 1 2 1 3 0 1 4
June 2011 0 0 0 1 2 1 3 0 1 4
June 2012 0 0 0 1 2 1 2 1 1 4
June 2013 5 4 1 1 2 4 5 0 1 4
 
Hospitals. The pattern with regards to hospitals is almost exactly the reverse; a very small number of establishments over all, a significant proportion are very large, and there are more such large establishments in Halton than in Peel. The growth in the number of hospitals with zero or 1-4 employees in the last year or so might in some instances reflect the creation of shell organizations for hospitals that are slated to begin actual operations in the near future.
 
Residential care facilities. In the case of nursing homes and residential care facilities, the number of such establishments is also smaller, but nevertheless considerably larger than the number of hospitals. The rate of growth in the number of these establishments has been very great, in both Peel and Halton Regions. For example, the number of these facilities with 5-19 employees in Peel has grown almost 3 times (using the ratio: from 100 to 288) while the number of similar establishments in Halton has grown over 5 times (using the ratio: from 100 to 539).
  
Table 6: Number of employers, residential care facilities, Peel and Halton, 2008-2013
 
 
 
 
 
NUMBER OF EMPLOYERS
 
PEEL   HALTON
0 1-4 5-19 20-99 100+ 0 1-4 5-19 20-99 100+
December 2008 31 22 25 74 27 12 13 13 24 10
June 2009 29 14 26 75 26 11 11 17 24 10
June 2010 33 62 76 72 28 14 17 62 29 12
December 2010 38 64 71 75 38 13 17 62 30 12
June 2011 39 60 72 82 35 23 17 61 28 12
June 2012 36 59 72 83 36 34 15 66 25 12
June 2013 75 69 72 95 36 43 16 70 29 12
RATIO
December 2008 100 100 100 100 100   100 100 100 100 100
June 2009 94 64 104 101 96 92 85 131 100 100
June 2010 107 282 304 97 104 117 131 477 121 120
December 2010 123 291 284 101 141 108 131 477 125 120
June 2011 126 273 288 111 130 192 131 469 117 120
June 2012 116 268 288 112 133 283 115 508 104 120
June 2013 242 314 288 128 133 358 123 539 121 120



1 Unfortunately, the comparison is between data from the mandatory long form census of 2006 and the voluntary long form questionnaire in the National Household Survey of 2011. Many concerns have been raised about the degree to which the 2011 survey reflects certain marginalized groups from those with low incomes or lower levels of educational attainment. This caution needs to be expressed when relying in National Household Survey data.
2 North American Industry Classification System.

WHY IT MATTERS
What this information means for job seekers and career choices:
  • The health care industry is a large and growing sector in Peel and Halton, and while it has been growing at a strong rate, it has still to reach the proportion of the labour force that is found in the rest of the province.
  • There are many different kinds of occupations to be found among the various subsectors of the health care industry with opportunities for administrative and clerical jobs as well as health care occupations.
  • Different subsectors have a very different mix of small and large employers; in many instances, the number of employers has been regularly increasing.
  • Health care jobs are not limited to hospitals; in fact, there are more jobs among out-patient facilities and health practitioners’ offices—the challenge in finding job openings, though, is the very large proportion of very small establishments.

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