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Dear Readers,

As we all know, the most important part of the passenger experience is passenger safety. In a bid to further promote safety – with a globally coordinated and harmonized approach – IATA has scheduled its first ever Cabin Operations Safety Conference. 

The event, which will take place on 20-22 May in Madrid and include active participation from ICAO, is already generating excitement in the airline industry.  Sessions will address everything from lithium battery fire prevention and child restraint devices, to PEDs on board and unruly passenger restraints. NTSB chairman Deborah Hersman is among the list of esteemed guests scheduled to present.

“Some carriers have contacted us and said, ‘we are working on every single one of these topics’. This really is the ‘go to’ event for cabin safety in 2014. 

IATA has worked hard to make it an event that offers high value for airline representative who will be taking time out of their busy schedules to come to Madrid in order to focus on cabin safety,” IATA manager cabin safety Suzanne Acton-Gervais tells Runway Girl Network. “The ICAO Safety Training Manual and Workshop will also be launched at this event and we are very grateful to have their support.”

She adds, “It is clear that industry is working together to focus on cabin safety, which results in the increase of passenger safety.” Runway Girl Network is proud to be a media sponsor for this event, and looks forward to providing coverage of the various sessions.

Separately, we’re also gearing up for the Aircraft Interiors Expo in April in Hamburg, where we’ll be producing an array of multi-media content. Please fee free to send embargoed news releases to my email address below.

Kind regards,

Mary Kirby

Founder and Editor, Runway Girl Network

mary@runwaygirlnetwork.com
@RunwayGirl on Twitter
 

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