Accessibility Now News

Website    Forward    View in browser
IAAP International Association of Accessibility Professionals
  1. Why public schools need to audit their website for accessibility right now
  2. Optimizing for accessibility + SEO: formatting and link overlaps
  3. Accessibility for all
  4. Microsoft turns on automation to improve accessibility testing for developers
  5. Web accessibility and keeping others in mind
  6. Accessibility in gaming should be the rule, not the exception
  7. Increasing legal scrutiny of website accessibility in the real estate industry



1

Why public schools need to audit their website for accessibility right now 

When it comes to web accessibility, the prevailing attitude at most schools is “we’ll get to it when we have to.” Well, that day is coming up fast for American public schools. The websites of 350 educational institutions are being investigated by the U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights (OCR) for their accessibility to people with disabilities. The OCR is cracking down on public school districts to ensure their websites are ADA-compliant.

Read the complete article on public school website accessibility audits

2

Optimizing for accessibility + SEO: formatting and link overlaps

Search engine optimization (SEO) evolved by search engines creating algorithms to automate the classification and ranking of websites, with SEOs manipulating the loopholes in those algos. Accessibility, on the other hand, is born out of a desire to be inclusive; to connect humans to information through assistive technology (AT).

When we strip down both industries to where a machine is reading a web page, there are a few overlaps. That’s what we’re looking at in this series. If you’re optimizing for search engines, you’re also affecting how people using screen readers and assistive technologies are experiencing your site.

Read the complete article on accessibility and SEO

3

Accessibility for all

In a nutshell, accessibility means that it works for people. In the digital world, this means putting the people first by creating intuitive sites that everyone can use. For me, accessibility on the web is about making an online environment where everyone is able to access the information they need without hitting constant barriers. We live in an age where digital is everywhere, but accessible digital is limited. It’s simple changes that we can make in our websites that make the biggest differences, [and] it's time that we all make a conscious effort to build an inclusive, accessible online world. 

Read the complete article on creating accessibility for all

4

Microsoft turns on automation to improve accessibility testing for developers

Accessibility guidelines for websites may not be a current priority for the United States Department of Justice but that does not mean that tech companies have adopted the same attitude. According to a blog post by the Microsoft Edge Team, the Microsoft Edge browser—which replaced the aging Internet Explorer as the default browser on all Windows 10 device classes—has gone through some significant accessibility-centric improvements in recent weeks, all of which were intended to allow developers to build “more accessible experiences” on the Web.

Read the complete article on Microsoft's effort to improve accessibility testing for developers

5

Web accessibility and keeping others in mind

Website accessibility has been on my mind recently. A few years back, one of the biggest trends on the Web was subtlety. Medium gray text on light gray backgrounds, super-thin fonts, etc. all looked quite elegant to designers, but in hindsight they were pretty unfair to the average user. At Matrix Group, we try to be as inclusive as possible, and that means paying attention to accessibility and designing our sites to be as usable by the widest range of people as humanly possible.

Our CEO, Joanna, sits in on site reviews, and she sometimes sends us back with edits because the contrast is way too low. She freely admits that her vision’s getting less sharp as the years go by, and if she’s got problems with contrast, other people will, too.

Read the complete article on web accessibility

6

Accessibility in gaming should be the rule, not the exception

Hats off to "Uncharted 4: A Thief's End" developer Naughty Dog. Not only have they created a critical and commercial smash hit that is widely being referred to as one of the finest games ever made, but they have taken pro-active steps to ensure that their farewell to Nathan Drake can be enjoyed by as many people as possible. Specifically, we're talking accessibility features.

In a rather sweet and honest video released by Sony last week, a number of the Naughty Dog development team recount the story of how they brought accessibility features—which were partially implemented for "The Last Of Us"—to "Uncharted 4," following a fan's revelation that he simply could not complete "Uncharted 2" without the assistance of an able-bodied person to help him get past a series of button-mashing door openings in the final chapters.

Read the complete article on accessibility in gaming

7

Increasing legal scrutiny of website accessibility in the real estate industry

From fair housing laws to licensing requirements, the real estate industry is accustomed to navigating various legal constraints and requirements. However, as a result of current ambiguity in the law, class action lawsuits based upon website accessibility pose an emerging threat to real estate brokers, lenders, homebuilders, and ultimately, any company that has a Web presence. Today almost all companies have a website, which is often used as the primary method to provide information and to market to current and future clients. But what about clients and prospects that have disabilities? Do they have equal access to your company website?

Read the complete article on website accessibility

WWW.ACCESSIBILITYASSOCIATION.ORG
IAAP - International Association of Accessibility Professionals