Copy
SciSchmooze Weekly Science Events Newsletter from the Bay Area Science Festival
View this email in your browser
SciSchmooze Weekly Events Newsletter

Events by Location: East Bay | North Bay | San Francisco | South Bay
Apologies for the late update this week!

With the Super Bowl behind us, it's time to turn the attention back to science! This Thursday comes the likely announcement that a team of scientists have discovered gravitational waves. Scientists from LIGO, Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory, have been searching for the evidence of these waves for years. These waves which are ripples in space-time that emanate out from a large source of mass. Existence of these waves is a crucial part of Einstein's theory of general relativity and would help explain early events in the Big Bang to what happens when supernovae explode.

It's unseasonably warm here in the Bay Area - often labeled "earthquake weather". While that is a ridiculous notion, it is a good reminder to make sure you are prepared. This Thursday, Lt. Gavin Newsom is hosting a forum on a California wide early detection system and preparedness in the Bay Area given the probability of a large Bay Area quake in the next 30 years.
 
My top picks for the week:
  1. The Teenage Brain - 02/10/2016 07:00 PM  San Francisco - Delve into adolescent brain research with some practical advice.
  2. 'Machines of Loving Grace: The Quest for Common Ground Between Humans and Robots' - 02/10/2016 07:00 PM Livermore - NY Times Science Writer John Markoff explores if robots are coming to help us or replace us
  3. A wake-up call for California: Innovations in earthquake preparedness - 2/11/2016 01:00 PM  Berkeley - a public forum with seismologists and Lt. Governor Gavin Newsom on early warning systems for earthquakes.
Have a great week in science!
-Kishore

Upcoming Events
Click to see the next two weeks of events in your browser.


Tuesday, 02/09/2016
Geology After Pluto - 02/09/2016 12:00 PM
SETI Institute Colloquium Series, Mountain View

Jeff Moore is the lead of the New Horizons Geology Team. He will talk about the discoveries made by the New Horizons mission on the fascinating fly by of the dwarf planet Pluto.

Speaker: Jeff Moore, NASA Ames


Towards Gene Therapy for Neurological Diseases - 02/09/2016 12:00 PM
Sonoma State University - Biology Colloquium, Rohnert Park

Speaker: Dr. Barbara Bailus, Buck Institute for Research on Aging


The Fight for Water - 02/09/2016 04:00 PM
Hillview Branch Library, San Jose

This historical documentary, set during the 2009 California Water Crisis, follows the stories of two Central Valley farmers. They discuss how water restrictions and environmental regulations have threatened their way of life, their American dream and their community. The crisis point was an environmental ruling to protect an endangered fish species that shut off their water supply and led to the layoff of thousands of migrant farm workers. This led to a water march across the heart of the California Central Valley by farmers, farm workers and a coalition of Latinos to demand that their water supply be turned back on.


Can We Find 10 TeV Particles Using Sub Millihertz Spectroscopy? Looking for the Electron's Electric Dipole Moment in Trapped Molecular Ions - 02/09/2016 04:30 PM
Hewlett Teaching Center, Stanford

Speaker: Eric Cornell, Univ. of Colorado


Clinical Empathy in a Post-ACA World - 02/09/2016 04:30 PM
UC Berkeley Extension, Berkeley

Learn how health care providers can recognize when their emotions are worsening conflicts with patients and families. In the current health care climate, providers are under increasing pressure to do more for patients in less time. Providers want to give empathic care but fear burning out. Patients and families are frustrated with the limitations of the health care system. As a result, there are often conflicts between providers, patients and families that can undermine effective health care. Gain exposure to specific skills that promote sustainable empathy to provide more effective care and to enjoy your work more.

Speaker: Jodi Halpern, UC Berkeley

Room 202


Open Space and Climate Resiliency - 02/09/2016 06:00 PM
Commonwealth Club, San Francisco

Blue Greenway's Jackie Omotalade will lead a panel discussion on climate change and the efficacy of employing open space and parks as a tool for climate resiliency at San Francisco's southeastern waterfront. Panelists will include the city administrator's office and other key players in the waterfront development initiative.

Panel:

Anthony Kahil, Candelstick Point Eco StewardsMarie Harrison, Greenaction Community OrganizerDavid Beaupre, Port of SF Senior Waterfront PlannerDanita Rodriguez, California State Parks District SuperintendentJacqueline Omotalade, Director, Blue Greenway, SF Parks Alliance-Moderator
The Fight for Water - 02/09/2016 06:00 PM
Los Gatos Library, Los Gatos

This historical documentary, set during the 2009 California Water Crisis, follows the stories of two Central Valley farmers. They discuss how water restrictions and environmental regulations have threatened their way of life, their American dream and their community. The crisis point was an environmental ruling to protect an endangered fish species that shut off their water supply and led to the layoff of thousands of migrant farm workers. This led to a water march across the heart of the California Central Valley by farmers, farm workers and a coalition of Latinos to demand that their water supply be turned back on.


Mega-Drought - 02/09/2016 06:30 PM
Mountain View Public Library, Mountain View

Trends indicate that a major drought event is looming in the not-too-distant future. In as few as three decades we could experience conditions that would make the Dust Bowl of the 1930s seem like an oasis. Efforts to conserve, while admirable and desperately necessary, may already be too late. This episode of the History Channel's mega-disaster series projects a scenario 70 years into the future in which a 12-year drought leaves the U.S. unstable and economically depressed. Western cities are abandoned, states clash for dwindling water supplies and society devolves into a battle for survival.


Climate Equity - 02/09/2016 06:30 PM
Commonwealth Club, San Francisco

Will a green economy be more equitable than the brown economy? As California transitions to renewable energy, the result will be green jobs, cleaner communities and lower carbon emissions. But will underserved communities get shafted? The environmental justice community has been concerned that the state's cap-and-trade program puts Brazilian rainforests over communities near refineries and factories. Will Sausalito and Vallejo get the same protection from rising seas and other impacts of a destabilized climate?

A conversation about increasing equity while reducing carbon pollution.

Panel:

Manuel Pastor, Univ. of Southern CaliforniaVien Truong, Green for AllMiya Yoshitani, Asia Pacific Environmental Network
Mysterious Sounds of the 'Silent' Sea - 02/09/2016 07:00 PM
St. Alban's Church, Albany

Introducing the public to the beautiful sights beneath the sea, Jacques Cousteau called it "The Silent World." But the ocean --- and our Bay – are filled with a fantastic cacophany of sound. Most sea animals -- from whales and dolphins to lobsters and shrimp - use acoustics to navigate and communicate.

With fascinating recordings, acoustician and naturalist Michael Stocker delves into bio-acoustics beneath the sea, and the effects of manmade sound. Sound engineer for the pioneering 1992 environmental film "Koyaanisqatsi" and designer of soundscapes for projects ranging from the National Holocaust Museum to the Monterey Bay Aquarium, Stocker also founded Marin's Ocean Conservation Research and is an important voice in limiting noise pollution in the ocean. His recent book, Hear Where We Are, explores how sound and sound perception affect our sense of self, community and surroundings.

Refreshments 7 PM, talks 7:30 - 9 PM.  This talk will be in the St. Albans Sanctuary.


Earth Under Water - 02/09/2016 07:30 PM
Mountain View Public Library, Mountain View

National Geographic explores the potential effects of sea level rise on our civilization over the next few centuries. "Earth Under Water" explains the science behind the prediction of sea level rise and shows what will happen if the levels rise with increasing speed. Then, we fast forward to the 23rd century to see how resourceful humans fight back and adapt using hyper engineering, vast dams, and even the construction of floating cities to cope with the after-effects.


Wednesday, 02/10/2016
Connected Critical Care - 02/10/2016 12:00 PM
CITRIS at UC Berkeley, Berkeley

Speaker: Jason Adams is a Physician in Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine at UC Davis Health System. His research is focused on host-pathogen genomics and clinical informatics.


Exchange processes in the estuary-ocean interface - 02/10/2016 03:30 PM
Romberg Tiburon Center for Environmental Studies, Tiburon

Speaker: Piero Mazzini, Rutgers University Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences


Shark Stewards - 02/10/2016 06:30 PM
Oakland Zoo, Oakland

Presented by marine biologist and ocean advocate David McGuire, Founder and Director of Shark Stewards. As Californians, we have a special responsibility for ocean conservation. Shark Stewards protects sharks and critical marine habitat for the health of our oceans through science, education and advocacy. Come learn about the challenges sharks face in the wild, and what you can do to help.


The Teenage Brain - 02/10/2016 07:00 PM
Jewish Community Center, San Francisco

For years, scientists believed that the adolescent brain was essentially an adult one – only with fewer miles on it. But revolutionary neurology and neuroscience have revealed that vitally important brain development occurs during the teen years. Internationally-renowned neurologist – and mother of two boys – Dr. Frances E. Jensen offers a fascinating glimpse into the adolescent brain, providing remarkable insights that translate into practical advice both for parents and teens.

Series subscription prices available 7/27.  Single tickets 8/17.


Tide Talks by Kame Richards - 02/10/2016 07:00 PM
Bay Model Visitors Center, Sausalito

Racers, cruisers, power boats, kayaks, and swimmers will see and learn how the tide currents move on San Francisco Bay. Reservations a must, call 707-759-2045 or email jimtantillo@comcast.net 


'Machines of Loving Grace: The Quest for Common Ground Between Humans and Robots' - 02/10/2016 07:00 PM
Civic Center Library, Livermore

As robots are increasingly integrated into modern society--on the battlefield and the road, in business, education, and health--New York Times science writer John Markoff searches for an answer to one of the most important questions of our age: will these machines help us, or will they replace us?

Copies will be available for sale courtesy of Towne Center Books of Pleasanton.

Speaker: John Markhoff


February LASER Event - Berkeley - 02/10/2016 07:00 PM
Soda Hall, Berkeley

7:00-7:25: David Anderson(UC Berkeley/ SETI@home) on "An introduction to SETI@home"What if ordinary people's devices could do scientific computing? ...Read more7:25-7:50: Rachna Nivas(Chitresh Das Dance Company) on "India's Meditation in Motion: Pushing Physical, Mental, and Spiritual Boundaries through Kathak Dance"A North Indian classical dance technique in which the performer simultaneously performs complex rhythmical movement, recites, sings and plays an instrument...Read more7:50-8:10: BREAK. Before or after the break, anyone in the audience currently working within the intersections of art and science will have 30 seconds to share their work. Please present your work as a teaser so that those who are interested can seek you out during social time following the event.8:10-8:35: Leah Krubitzer(UC Davis/ Neurobiology) on "How does Evolution build a Complex Brain"Abstract forthcoming...Read more8:35-9:00: Ken Goldberg(UC Berkeley) on "Wow and Flutter: Perception and the Seismic Landscape"Art installations that use a live stream of seismic data...Read more9:00pm-9:30pm: Discussions, networkingYou can mingle with the speakers and the audience
4th Dimensional Graphing at the Edge - 02/10/2016 07:00 PM
Science Buzz Cafe, Sebastopol

 

Speaker: Roger House


History of Water in Silicon Valley - 02/10/2016 07:00 PM
Cupertino Library, Cupertino

This presentation by the Santa Clara Valley Water District will showcase the past, present and future of water in Silicon Valley. It will take a close look at what we have done to ensure a reliable supply of safe, clean water throughout the years as population density has increased and as the main industries of the valley have changed. It will also look at historical flooding and what we have done -- and continue to do -- to protect lives, homes and businesses, including the latest preparations and actions to guard against the "Godzilla" El Niño we have been promised in 2016. It will include tips for water conservation for the drought and flood protection for El Niño storms -- a dichotomy that we're living today.


Sitting by a Cozy Fire – Wood burning, Air Quality & Your Health - 02/10/2016 07:30 PM
Marin Science Seminar, San Rafael

Speaker: Eric Stevenson , Bay Area Air Quality Management District


Discovering Raptors - 02/10/2016 07:30 PM
Stanford University - Cemex Auditorium, Stanford

Raptors frequently evoke admiration because of their power, their eye-catching flight, and their noble bearing. They display a fascinating array of behaviors-some obviously instinctive, others clearly learned. But why do they act as they do? Helen Macdonald, in her memorable book H is for Hawk, demonstrates one way to get inside a raptor's mind: by keeping one captive. A falconer, as the falcon's hunting companion, has an unequaled opportunity to observe not only the raptor's behavior but also that of other birds of prey that are drawn to it with various intentions. For example, why would a Peregrine court a falcon of a different species a sixth of its own size? Or a Cooper's Hawk try four different strategies to reach a caged pigeon? Why do Merlins sometimes accompany harriers? The answers to these and many other questions are often surprising. Raptors have varied personalities, too, and different physical capabilities, all of which will be explored in this evening program, along with pointers for identification.

Speaker: Hans Peeters, Chabot College (Emeritus)



Thursday, 02/11/2016
Predicting the Electromagnetic Signatures of Compact Object Mergers - 02/11/2016 11:00 AM
Kavli Institute Astrophysics Colloquium, Menlo Park

The ejection of radioactive material during, or immediately following, the merger of two neutron stars (or a neutron star and a black hole) can give rise to optical/infrared emission similar to, but dimmer and briefer than that of an ordinary supernova. These transients (called kilonovae) are promising electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational wave sources, and may be diagnostic of the sites of heavy element production. I will describe the physics of kilonovae, and present calculations that demonstrate how the color and brightness of such events carry information about the merger physics, such as the mechanism of mass ejection, the composition of outflows, the survival lifetime of a remnant hyper-massive neutron star, or the spin of a remnant black hole. These models inform observational strategies for finding kilonovae, and illustrate how we can use observations to better understand the sources of gravitational waves and the origin of the heavy elements in the Universe.

Speaker: Dan Kasen, UC Berkeley


Plant Travelers: From the Architecture of Life Tour Series - 02/11/2016 01:00 PM
UC Botanical Garden, Berkeley

 

Can plants really travel? Marvel at botanical fruit and seed adaptations, such as slingshots, parachutes, hitchhikers, helicopters and other mechanisms that propel plant seeds around the Garden.

Register at web site


A wake-up call for California: Innovations in earthquake preparedness - 02/11/2016 01:00 PM
Sutardja Dai Hall, Berkeley

No one likes to be reminded that there's a 99.7% chance that California will experience a major earthquake in the next 30 years.  But a little preparedness can go a long way and a new mobile-friendly website called QuakeCAFE can help.

We invite you to join us for a public forum where we will discuss the data and lessons learned from QuakeCAFE followed by a panel discussion on new innovations for earthquake early warning, preparedness, and response.

Launched by the CITRIS Connected Communities Initiative at UC Berkeley in collaboration with the Office of the Lt. Governor of California, QuakeCAFE provides Californians with a powerful tool that allows them to quickly and easily assess their level of preparedness, and compare their readiness for the Big One with others across the state.

It works on all screens and takes only a minute to complete: http://quakecafe.org

Speakers: Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom and Prof. Ken Goldberg and the QuakeCAFE team will be joined by Prof. Peggy Hellweg from the UC Berkeley Seismological Lab; Dr. Ross Stein, co-founder of Temblor, a startup that enables people to learn their seismic hazard and how to reduce their risk; and Amina Assefa, Manager of the Office of Emergency Management, UC Berkeley.


Creature Crush NightLife - 02/11/2016 06:00 PM
California Academy of Sciences, San Francisco

 

From animal attraction to human nature, celebrate the science behind the things that make us blush at this special Valentine's Day edition of NightLife.

From animal attraction to human nature, celebrate the science behind the things that make us blush at this special Valentine's Day edition of NightLife.

Start the night off by snapping a photo of your favorite Academy animal valentine (be sure to tag it with #CreatureCrush) and tell us why you love it for a chance to win an exclusive, up-close animal encounter!

Love Talks
(African Hall)
7:00 - 8:00pm, Starting at 7:00pm hear a fascinating talk on love, sex and communication with Marcia Baczynski. Then at 8:00pm, explore diversity and fluidity in love and sex with Carol Queen and Robert Lawrence from the Center for Sex and Culture.

Good Vibes Hall
(East Pavillion)
6:00 - 10:00pm, Marvel at beautiful blooms from the Pacific Orchid Exposition and see how to tend your orchid garden while viewing antique and modern vibrators with SF institution Good Vibrations.

Cupid's Corner
(Swamp)
6:00 - 10:00pm, Up for a cupid's challenge? Get crafty while making your own liquid-marbled valentines with Julia Moore, or, from 6:30 - 8:30pm, type out a love poem to your secret crush (or #CreatureCrush!) with Silvi from The Poetry Store and her vintage typewriter.

If words just aren't your thing, try to draw your date while blindfolded with local alternative art community Paint Pens Collective. Then learn about the animal kingdom's weirdest mating and reproduction stories with Academy biologist Kelly Markello and take a stroll through the Animal Attraction aquarium gallery. Can you feel the love?


Tide Talks by Kame Richards - 02/11/2016 07:00 PM
Bay Model Visitors Center, Sausalito

Racers, cruisers, power boats, kayaks, and swimmers will see and learn how the tide currents move on San Francisco Bay. Reservations a must, call 707-759-2045 or email jimtantillo@comcast.net 


Understanding Bipolar Depression - 02/11/2016 07:00 PM
Stanford Hospital Health Library, Palo Alto

This talk will provide a broad overview of bipolar depression in adults, with respect to diagnostic challenges and current treatment strategies for this condition.

Speaker: Shefali Miller, MD, Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University Medical Center


February LASER Event - Stanford - 02/11/2016 07:00 PM
LASER Leonardo Art Science Evening Rendezvous, Stanford

7:00-7:25: Birgitta Whaley(Berkeley Quantum Information and Computation Center) on "What role does Quantum Mechanics play in Biology?Advances in nanotechnology are driving the development of microscopic studies of biological phenomena...Read more7:25-7:50: Rieko Yajima(Stanford/ Design and AAAS) on "Catalyzing scientific innovation using design-thinking paradigms"Design Thinking Paradigms (DTP) have successfully been applied to non-design fields...Read more7:50-8:10: BREAK. Before or after the break, anyone in the audience currently working within the intersections of art and science will have 30 seconds to share their work. Please present your work as a teaser so that those who are interested can seek you out during social time following the event.8:10-8:35: Christine Lee(Visual Artist and Designer) on "Latent Potential - Using art, design and engineering to help divert materials from going to the landfill"Rethinking what we consider to be trash and creating a sense of accountability for the amount of excess waste generated...Read more8:35-9:00: Jennifer Widom(Stanford/Computer Science) on "Big Data, Big Discoveries, Big Fallacies"It is surprisingly easy to come to false conclusions from data analysis alone...Read more9:00pm-9:30pm: Discussions, networkingYou can mingle with the speakers and the audience

Li Ka Shing Center, Room LK120


Imaging the Dark Universe - 02/11/2016 07:00 PM
Santa Cruz Astronomy Club, Santa Cruz

The Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, or KIPAC, is an independent laboratory of Stanford University. Initiated with a generous grant from Fred Kavli and The Kavli Foundation, KIPAC is housed at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and in the Varian Physics and Physics Astrophysics buildings on the Stanford campus. The lab is funded in part by Stanford University and the United States Department of Energy. 

The LSST is a new kind of telescope. Currently under construction at Cerro Pachón, a mountain peak in northern Chilé, the LSST is designed to conduct a ten-year survey of the dynamic universe. LSST can map the entire visible sky in just a few nights; each panoramic snapshot with the 3200-megapixel camera covers an area 40 times the size of the full moon. 

Images will be immediately analyzed to identify objects that have change or moved: from exploding supernovae on the other side of the Universe to asteroids that might impact the Earth. 

In the ten-year survey lifetime, LSST will map tens of billions of stars and galaxies. With this map, scientists will explore the structure of the Milky Way, determine the properties of dark energy and dark matter, and make discoveries that we have not yet imagined. 

Speaker: Prof. Aaron Roodman is Deputy Director of KIPAC and is SLAC's system scientist for the LSST camera integration and testing. Beginning in 2022, LSST's 3,200-megapixel camera will take snapshots of the night sky with unparalleled detail. Over its planned 10 years of operations, it will create an archive of tens of billions of cosmic objects and their movements – a treasure trove for researchers studying all kinds of astronomical phenomena, especially time-dependent ones.


Skepticism in the Gym: Exceeding Fitness Goals with Science, Evidence, and Critical Thinking - 02/11/2016 07:30 PM
La Peña Lounge, Berkeley

Pseudoscience is pervasive in the fitness industry, from extraordinary claims to common misconceptions. Bodybuilding, itself a rather extraordinary claim, is often worse. This talk addresses common misconceptions and excuses about fitness derived from the presenter's research and journey to fitness. The central message is that tools of science, evidence, and critical thinking intrinsic to the skeptical movement can be applied to not only live better for longer but also achieve a level of fitness well beyond that accepted by most of society. In the process, rational framework will be proposed for novices approaching this subject based on evidence and research while punctuated with anecdotes. Everyone loves "Skeptics in the Pub" but hopefully this paper will encourage more skeptics in the gym.Jay Diamond is the founder of Reason4Reason – a skeptical activist group based in the San Francisco bay area. He holds dual masters degrees in engineering and business and has managed both startup companies and hundred-million-dollar programs for Fortune 50 companies. Growing up in Canada, he performed magic, studied science, and became aware of the skeptical movement. Jay has lectured around the world on science & technology, business, and skepticism.

HOW:   Presented free by the Bay Area Skeptics


WHY:   Because humans are fascinating!



Friday, 02/12/2016
Green Friday - 02/12/2016 07:00 PM
Sierra Club Northern Alameda County, Berkeley

Our speaker will be Alice Friedemann, who has been writing about energy and other resources since 2000. Her writing can be found at her http://energyskeptic.com/ web site. Virtually everything in our homes, everything in our stores, got there on a truck. Prior to that, 90 percent of those items were transported on a ship and/or a train. If trucks, trains, and ships stopped running, our global economy and way of life would stop too. Oil fuels commercial transportation, and makes the world go round. In her new book, "When Trucks Stop Running: Energy and the Future of Transportation", Alice Friedemann looks ahead, exploring the range of options for the future, when oil is no longer abundant and affordable. Renewable electricity – solar and wind -- is ramping up, but in our optimism over the renewable revolution, we collectively forget that our trucks, ships, and freight trains don't run on electricity. Alice will discuss the surprising challenges of electrifying trucks and locomotives from an electric grid increasingly powered by renewables. As her book makes clear, the time is now to take a realistic and critical look at the choices ahead, and how the future of transportation may unfold.



Saturday, 02/13/2016
Trails Less Traveled - 02/13/2016 09:30 AM
Muir Woods National Monument, Mill Valley

 

Join Ranger Aimee in exploring the less-traveled trails at Muir Woods. From where the popular Main Trail diverges with the Fern Creek Trail, we will take the one less traveled by to Camp Alice Eastwood Trail.

The cascades, ferns, and fragrant tanoaks of this quiet side canyon of Muir Woods will inspire us to learn about "Leave No Trace" ethics and how to better protect the forest for others.

Meet at the Visitor Center. Bring water, snack, and wear sturdy shoes.

This is a family-friendly, three-mile walk. Must be able to hike moderate slopes and be able to stand for extended periods of time.

Entrance fee applies. Reservations required; call (415) 388-2596.


Little Explorers Workshop: Tails and Workshops - 02/13/2016 10:00 AM
Lawrence Hall of Science, Berkeley

Make take-home projects and do activities with our menagerie of animals, including rabbits, turtles, and birds. Young children develop an appreciation of living things and spark their curiosity with a new animal theme each week.


Open House at the Marine Science Institute - 02/13/2016 10:00 AM
Marine Science Institute, Redwood City

Please bring your friends and family to visit our site.  Feel fre to explore our discovery classrooms, view live fish and invertebrates in our aquarium, and pack a picnic lunch to nibble on whilst enjoing our Bay front location.  Staff will be around to answer questions and give you a tour of the facility.

No reservations required.

Parental or guardian supervision is required for all children.


Marshlands of Dreams - 02/13/2016 10:00 AM
Don Edwards Refuge Headquarters & Visitors Center, Freemont

Join Paul Mueller on a 1-mile walk of the LaRiviere Marsh Trail to find traces of the past. Prior to marsh restoration, learn how Californians utilized the area for farming, quarrying, salt production, and transportation.  There will opportunities for bird watching as well.


Hike the Mallard Slough Trail - 02/13/2016 10:00 AM
Don Edwards Refuge Environmental Education Center, Alviso

Look for birds, mammals, and animal tracks as we explore along the water's edge on this 3.7-mile nature walk. Bring binoculars and your favorite field guide to help enjoy the views. Have at least one liter of water, snacks, and appropriate clothing. This hike runs rain or shine. Led by Steve Stolper. RESERVATIONS REQUIRED. Go tohttp://hikeeectrail.eventbrite.com. Questions? Call Julie at 408-262-5513 ext. 104.


Drones: Love 'em or Hate 'em...? - 02/13/2016 11:00 AM
Hiller Aviation Museum, San Carlos

Tom Gregory graduated from Cal Berkely and retired from NASA-Ames Research Center after 37 years where he worked with the wind tunnels, simulators, computers, and flight test aircraft.  Much of that work was on remotely piloted vehicles (RPVs) or "drones" as they are called now. He is currently studying and flying quad copters with interest in package delivery. He will discuss this exciting field and the concerns of citizens, regulators and entrepenuers. The presentation will use slides and videos of quad-copters, hybrid winged quadcopters and other concepts. Several aircraft will be on display including some flown with virtual reality goggles that use an onboard video camera and a transmitter to let you feel as if you are in the vehicle. The presentation will cover a little history, some contemporary civilian and military "drones", as well as a glimpse into possible future aircraft.


MicroBioblitz at PLACE - 02/13/2016 03:00 PM
PLACE for Sustainable Living, Oakland

Tardigrades, Diatoms and Nematodes oh my! We'll use microscopes and smartphone magnifying lenses to explore the wonderments of the microscopic world at PLACE for Sustainable Living in Oakland.

Have you ever wondered about all of the small organisms that are around you all the time? Finally... you'll have a chance to see them! We will have microscopes, macro lenses for cell phones, and plenty of cool niches at PLACE to look for organisms including water catchment systems, composts, a garden, etc.

Expert microscopists will show you how to  use microscopes if you need help. If you have your own microscope and want to learn how to use it, bring it along! 

We will be attempting to catalog the organisms into the iNaturalist.org platform, so bring your smartphone or digital camera! Please download the FREE iNaturalist app on your smartphone before the blitz. Look for the app in Google Play or the App Store on your smartphone. 

We have limited space, so please get your FREE ticket for this event here: http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/2488933


Water Detectives - 02/13/2016 03:30 PM
Riconada Library, Palo Alto

In Matamoros, Mexico, a severe water shortage led to a one-of-a-kind solution: The city put local children in charge of changing adults' attitudes and habits. Thousands of schoolchildren were enlisted as "water detectives." Educated about resource conservation, they were encouraged to discuss proper water usage with adults and were authorized to give "tickets" to transgressors seen to be wasting water. The municipality followed up by fixing leaks and visiting homes. The result? Matamoros lowered its water consumption by nearly 20 percent in just one year!


Mega-Drought - 02/13/2016 04:00 PM
Riconada Library, Palo Alto

Trends indicate that a major drought event is looming in the not-too-distant future. In as few as three decades we could experience conditions that would make the Dust Bowl of the 1930s seem like an oasis. Efforts to conserve, while admirable and desperately necessary, may already be too late. This episode of the History Channel's mega-disaster series projects a scenario 70 years into the future in which a 12-year drought leaves the U.S. unstable and economically depressed. Western cities are abandoned, states clash for dwindling water supplies and society devolves into a battle for survival.


Earth Under Water - 02/13/2016 05:00 PM
Riconada Library, Palo Alto

National Geographic explores the potential effects of sea level rise on our civilization over the next few centuries. "Earth Under Water" explains the science behind the prediction of sea level rise and shows what will happen if the levels rise with increasing speed. Then, we fast forward to the 23rd century to see how resourceful humans fight back and adapt using hyper engineering, vast dams, and even the construction of floating cities to cope with the after-effects.


Parent's Night Off - 02/13/2016 05:30 PM
Oakland Zoo, Oakland

Chocolate & Roses – check!  Romantic dinner reservation – booked! Do not disturb sign – printed!  Child care – uh oh! 

Let us look after your kids for you, while you take some quality time for yourselves! Even though they are for kids, Parent's Nights Off are designed with adults in mind - offering a safe, educational, and fun-filled environment.  After drop off and dinner, we'll start the night by taking a guided night tour. Afterward, we will head back for an animal up-close, a holiday themed craft, and some games. To finish it all up, we'll end the night with a movie on the big screen. We guarantee you will pick them up happier, smarter, and best of all, exhausted!

Ages: 4-10 (must be potty trained)



Sunday, 02/14/2016
Marine Mammal Parents and Pups - 02/14/2016 10:00 AM
Marine Mammal Center, Sausalito

In preparation for Valentine's Day, this month we celebrate love under the sea with Marine Mammal Parents and Pups in a fun, educational way for both kids and adults. We recommend teaming our free classroom program with a Docent-led tour at 11am, 1pm or 3pm for a truly immersive marine mammal experience. Read on for more info... 

Program Summary

 

FREE Classroom Programs: Love is the Air: Marine Mammal Parents and Pups- 12 PM and 2 PM (1 hour sessions)

Join Adam Ratner, marine biologist and animal care volunteer at The Marine Mammal Center, for an interactive presentation on the special and unusual dating habits of marine mammals and their resulting cute pups! Adam will talk about how gray whales only date when on vacation to Baja California, elephant seals must fight for their girlfriends, and showcase how unbelievably adorable marine mammal babies are, including a cutest marine mammal baby contest! Sessions are held in the Center's classroom at 12pm and 2pm. A great compliment to the docent-led tour!

Docent-led Tours* - 11:00 AM, 1:00 PM, and 3:00 PM 

Learn fascinating facts about seals and sea lions from our education experts while seeing exhibits and patient viewing areas. (*Small fee applies, it helps our patients!). 

 


Come inside i-GATE: The Innovation Hub Open House - 02/14/2016 11:00 AM
i-GATE innovation hub, Livermore 

i-GATE is a State-sponsored iHub (innovation hub) and startup incubator.  i-GATE's partners include the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, as well as the cities of Livermore, Danville, Pleasanton, and Dublin.

Through technology showcases, startup education, and shared lab and workspaces, i-GATE is a key partner in bringing lab technology into the market.

On February 14, 2016, i-GATE opens its doors to the public.  Everyone is invited--kids of all ages.

Step inside i-GATE and learn about some of the cool things inside this innovation hub, such as their 3D printer and Robot Garden.

For more information about i-GATE, visit http://www.igateihub.org

 


'A Nubian Walked into a Christian Bar at Philae and Asked...' - 02/14/2016 02:30 PM
Northern Cal Egyptology Lectures, Berkeley

"A Nubian Walked into a Christian Bar at Philae and Asked..." 

What can the ancient graffiti at Philae in Aswan tell us about how different groups interacted as Egypt began to Christianize?  Dr. Cruz-Uribe will discuss the Christian versus Nubian graffiti to give a sense of what the different groups were dealing with during this process, based on his studies in the Isis Temple on Philae, where he has looked at the nature of ancient graffiti, especially his favorite: Demotic graffiti. 

ABOUT THE SPEAKER
Eugene Cruz-Uribe was born and raised in Green Bay, Wisconsin and received his BA, MA and PhD in Egyptology from the Oriental Institute at the University of Chicago.  His dissertation was a study of Demotic legal contracts from the Saite and Persian periods in Egypt.  He worked as a lecturer at the Field Museum in Chicago and as a curator at the Seattle Art Museum and the Metropolitan Museum of Art during the Treasures of Tutankhamun exhibit during the later 1970s.  He was an Assistant Professor in the Egyptology Department at Brown University before he went to Northern Arizona University, where he held a number of administrative and teaching positions and where he is a Professor Emeritus in the Department of History.  He also taught Global History at California State University - Monterey Bay.  He was the recipient of a Fulbright Research Fellowship in 2007 to continue his studies in Egypt.  In July 2008 he became the editor of the Journal of the American Research Center in Egypt, the principal journal for Egyptology research in the US.  Currently he is Professor of History at Indiana University East. 

He is the author of 6 books, more than  60 articles, and 40 book reviews, dealing with all periods of Egyptian history and culture, with an emphasis on the Demotic stage of the ancient Egyptian language and the history and religion of the Late Period in Egypt. He has conducted a number of field research projects in Egypt, working in Kharga Oasis in the western desert, and throughout the Nile Valley. For the last fifteen years he has been recording and translating ancient Egyptian graffiti for what they reveal about personal piety, late period religious practices and pilgrimage. 

Sponsored by the Northern California Chapter of the American Research Center in Egypt; the Department of Near Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley; and the Center for Middle Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley
Valentine's Day Amphibian Walk + Happy Hour - 02/14/2016 05:00 PM
Grizzley Bar and Grill, Berkeley

California Center for Natural History and East Bay Regional Parks are teaming up to bring you a Valentine's Day treat - nature walk meets happy hour! Join us for an evening tour of Wildcat Creek's amorous amphibians, then mingle with fellow nature lovers at the Grizzly Bar and Grill (open late just for the occasion) while participating in amphibian trivia, interpretive newt dancing, and more.

5 - 6:30pm: Amphibian reproduction walk along Wildcat Creek

6:30 - 9pm: Trivia, newt dancing, and more at the Grizzly Bar and Grill



Monday, 02/15/2016
BIG BANG MACHINE - 02/15/2016 04:00 PM
Sonoma State University - What Physicists Do, Rohnert Park

A presentation of the PBS Nova episode "BIG BANG MACHINE" which chronicles the discovery of the Higgs Boson at the Large Hadron Collider.



Tuesday, 02/16/2016
Potentially biogenic carbon preserved in a 4.1 billion year old zircon - 02/16/2016 12:00 PM
SETI Institute Colloquium Series, Mountain View

Although our planet is approximately 4.5 billion years old (Ga), Earth's fossil record extends only to 3.5 Ga, the chemofossil record arguably to 3.8 Ga, and the rock record to 4.0 Ga.  However, detrital zircons from Jack Hills, Western Australia range in age up to nearly 4.4 Ga.  From a population of over 10,000 zircons from this locality, we identified one 4.10 Ga zircon that contains primary graphite inclusions in a crack-free region, and report carbon isotopic measurements on the graphite.  Evidence for carbon cycling or biologic activity can be derived from carbon isotopic studies, since a high ratio of 12C/13C is characteristic of biogenic carbon.  The 12C-rich isotopic signature of these graphite inclusions is consistent with a biogenic origin and may be evidence that a terrestrial biosphere had emerged by 4.1 Ga, or ~300 million years earlier than has been previously proposed.

Speaker: Elizabeth Bell, UCLA

 

 
Bees in a Changing World: How Land Surface Phenology, Bee Community Distributions, and Pollinator-Plant Interactions are Impacted by Urbanization and - 02/16/2016 12:00 PM
Sonoma State University - Biology Colloquium, Rohnert Park

Speaker: Dr. Misha Leong, California Academy of Sciences


The Baylands and Climate Change - 02/16/2016 12:30 PM
SF Planning + Urban Research Assoc. (SPUR), San Francisco

 

Sufficient, healthy wetlands, marshes and tidal areas are essential to protecting the region's many homes and workplaces from future flooding, but our local baylands have been significantly diminished and are threatened by future sea level rise. A new report developed by hundreds of scientists, and led by the California Coastal Conservancy and the San Francisco Estuary Institute, identifies the necessary steps to build and maintain a healthy bay in a climate-changed future. Come hear what they learned.

Speakers: Matt Gerhart / State of California Coastal Conservancy; Letitia Grenier, San Francisco Estuary Institute


A Quantum Optical Spin Glass: Toward Neuromorphic Photonic Computing - 02/16/2016 04:30 PM
Hewlett Teaching Center, Stanford

Speaker: Benjamin Lev, Stanford


Creative Collisions: Meetup Fair - 02/16/2016 06:30 PM
The Tech Museum of Innovation, San Jose

Introducing a made-for-all one-of-a-kind event: the Meetup Fair, a gathering of meetup groups from across the Bay Area. Meetup Fair is an event of Creative Collisions, an evening series at The Tech generously sponsored by the Swanson Family. We'll have crafts and Quidditch. Singers and drummers. Business and art and tech and more, all rolled into one unique evening designed to connect you with your people.


Fremont in the Ice Age - 02/16/2016 07:00 PM
Fremont Main Library, Fremont

The Ice Age is defined in North American from the fossils found in Irvington.  New fossils found in the Warm Springs district bring more information of how the large mammals in Fremont disappeared.  Activities will include making headbands, footprints, and more.


Earth Under Water - 02/16/2016 07:00 PM
Saratoga Library, Saratoga

National Geographic explores the potential effects of sea level rise on our civilization over the next few centuries. "Earth Under Water" explains the science behind the prediction of sea level rise and shows what will happen if the levels rise with increasing speed. Then, we fast forward to the 23rd century to see how resourceful humans fight back and adapt using hyper engineering, vast dams, and even the construction of floating cities to cope with the after-effects.


Amillaria Gallica, The Honey Mushroom - 02/16/2016 07:00 PM
Mycological Society of San Francisco, San Francisco

Speaker: Stefano Catona


Speaking of Sex... - 02/16/2016 07:00 PM
Public Works, San Francisco

 

In this talk, we will explore the origins of human sexuality through a surprising lens: research on our voices.

Speaker: Dr. David Puts is an Associate Professor of Anthropology and member of the Centers for Brain, Behavior, and Cognition (CBBC) and Human Evolution and Diversity (CHED) at The Pennsylvania State University. His laboratory investigates the roles of sex hormones, genetics, and sexual selection in shaping human anatomy, psychology, and behavior. He has published more than 80 articles and chapters in such journals as Evolution and Human Behavior, Nature Neuroscience, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Hormones and Behavior, PLOS Genetics, and Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. Dr. Puts is Co-Editor of the journal Evolutionary Psychology and is Editorial Board member of the journals Adaptive Human Behavior and Physiology, Archives of Sexual Behavior, Evolutionary Psychological Science, Evolution and Human Behavior, and Hormones and Behavior. His textbook The Evolution of Human Sexuality: An Anthropological Perspective (2009, Kendall/Hunt) is in its 2nd edition. He received the New Investigator Award (2004), Margo Wilson Award (2010), and Early Career Award for Distinguished Scientific Contribution (2013) from the Human Behavior and Evolution Society, and his research has been featured in such media outlets as Discovery Channel, BBC radio, Men's Health, National Public Radio, and The Economist.


A Hard Rain's a-gonna Fall - 02/16/2016 07:45 PM
San Francisco Amateur Astronomers, San Francisco

 

Throughout the entire history of life on Earth, we have been at the mercy of the deadly impacts by rocks from space. Just ask the dinosaurs! On multiple occasions, devastating impacts from Near Earth Objects (NEOs) have probably wiped out life on Earth, requiring life here to start over again. However, these events are not relegated to Earth's distant past. Each year, Earth experiences multiple near misses by asteroids and, as in the case of the Chelyabinsk event of 2013, sometimes takes a direct hit. But now, for the first time in the entire history of life on Earth, we have the capability of doing something about it. In this talk, we will examine the threats posed to us by NEOs, explore strategies and technologies to mitigate these threats, and look at ways in which the amateur astronomy community can help save the world.

Speaker: Brian Day



Wednesday, 02/17/2016
Tackling Urban Challenges with Technology - 02/17/2016 12:00 PM
CITRIS at UC Berkeley, Berkeley

Future of Nearshore Processes along the California Coast - 02/17/2016 03:30 PM
Romberg Tiburon Center for Environmental Studies, Tiburon

Power, Accountability, and Human Rights in a Networked World - 02/17/2016 04:10 PM
South Hall, Berkeley

Evolution: Earth and Life Together - 02/17/2016 07:00 PM
Science Buzz Cafe, Sebastopol

Fungal Philosophies - Mythbuster, or Fungal Fables Debunked - 02/17/2016 07:00 PM
Mycological Society of San Francisco, San Francisco

Water and California: Where Do We Go From Here? - 02/17/2016 07:30 PM
LinkedIn, Sunnyvale


Thursday, 02/18/2016
Compact Object Mergers - 02/18/2016 11:00 AM
Kavli Institute Astrophysics Colloquium, Menlo Park

Coastal Paleontology Monitoring at Point Reyes - 02/18/2016 12:00 PM
Point Reyes National Seashore, Point Reyes Station

The Ecosystems of California Symposium - 02/18/2016 01:00 PM
California Academy of Sciences, San Francisco

How and Why We Control Invasives in the Park - 02/18/2016 02:00 PM
Tennessee Valley Nursery, Mill Valley

Water Detectives - 02/18/2016 04:00 PM
Bascom Library and Community Center, San Jose

Bleeding Edge FPGA and Digital Design: New Challenges At High Gigabit Rates - 02/18/2016 04:00 PM
Sonoma State Dept. of Engineering Science, Rohnert Park

Bio-Inspired Sensors for Wearable Electronics and Prosthetics - 02/18/2016 05:00 PM
PARC Forum, Palo Alto

The 49ers Champion Levi's® Stadium: The First LEED Gold New Stadium and Venue - 02/18/2016 06:00 PM
Commonwealth Club, San Francisco

Noise Pop Nightlife - 02/18/2016 06:00 PM
California Academy of Sciences, San Francisco

Protecting the Waterbirds of S.F. Bay - 02/18/2016 06:30 PM
Golden Gate Audobon Society, Berkeley

The Fight for Water - 02/18/2016 07:00 PM
Santa Clara City Library, Santa Clara

Fungal Philosophies - Mythbusters, or Fungal Fables Debunked - 02/18/2016 07:30 PM
Bay Area Mycological Society, Berkeley

Everything Matters: Sodium - 02/18/2016 08:00 PM
Exploratorium, San Francisco


Friday, 02/19/2016
Searching for the First Stars Through Nuclear Reactions - 02/19/2016 07:30 PM
Tri-Valley Stargazers, Livermore

The Evolution of Planetary Landscapes from Callisto to Helene - 02/19/2016 07:30 PM
Peninsula Astronomical Society, Los Altos Hills

ClimateMusic Project Concert - 02/19/2016 08:00 PM
Chabot Space and Science Center, Oakland


Saturday, 02/20/2016
Birding for Beginners at Middle Harbor Shoreline Park - 02/20/2016 09:00 AM
Middle Harbor Shoreline Park, Oakland

WWII in the Shadow of Mt. Tam - 02/20/2016 10:00 AM
Bay Model Visitors Center, Sausalito

A Rare Ecosystem: Livermore's Alkali Habitat - 02/20/2016 10:00 AM
Robert Livermore Community Center, Livermore

Tour of water purification system - 02/20/2016 10:00 AM
Silicon Valley Advanced Water Purification Center, San Jose

Aquarium of the Bay and BayMobile - 02/20/2016 11:30 AM
Bay Model Visitors Center, Sausalito

SCIENCE: And Our Climate - 02/20/2016 11:30 AM
Bay Model Visitors Center, Sausalito

Frogs & Turtles of Mt. Tam - 02/20/2016 02:00 PM
Presidio of San Francisco, San Francisco

Low Tide Walk - 02/20/2016 02:30 PM
Fiddlers Cove, Pescadaro


Sunday, 02/21/2016
No Wetsuit Required: Adventures of a Fish Veterinarian - 02/21/2016 01:00 PM
Seymour Center at Long Marine Lab, Santa Cruz

The West Without Water: A History of Droughts and Floods in California - 02/21/2016 02:00 PM
Cupertino Community Hall, Cupertino


Monday, 02/22/2016
National Engineers Week: Tower Construction - 02/22/2016 03:30 PM
Hiller Aviation Museum, San Carlos

Climate Refugees - 02/22/2016 04:00 PM
Rose Garden Branch Library, San Jose

THE HUNT FOR NEW PLANETS - 02/22/2016 04:00 PM
Sonoma State University - What Physicists Do, Rohnert Park

Will Renewable Energy Markets Continue to Grow? - 02/22/2016 04:30 PM
Stanford University Energy Seminar, Stanford

The Fight for Water - 02/22/2016 06:30 PM
Sunnyvalle Public Library, Sunnyvalle

TensorFlow: Machine Learning for Everyone - 02/22/2016 06:30 PM
eBay Whitman Campus, San Jose

Calling the Cosmos: How to Talk with Extraterrestrials - 02/22/2016 07:30 PM
California Academy of Sciences, San Francisco


Tuesday, 02/23/2016
The Breakthrough Initiative - Listen and Megastructures at KIC 8463 - 02/23/2016 12:00 PM
SETI Institute Colloquium Series, Mountain View

California Naturalist Program and Citizen Science - 02/23/2016 12:00 PM
Sonoma State University - Biology Colloquium, Rohnert Park

National Engineers Week: Drone Design - 02/23/2016 03:30 PM
Hiller Aviation Museum, San Carlos

Contemporary Climate Change as Seen Through Measurements - 02/23/2016 04:10 PM
Martin Luther King Jr. Student Union, Berkeley

The Genesis of General Relativity and its Formative Years - 02/23/2016 04:30 PM
Hewlett Teaching Center, Stanford

Earth Under Water - 02/23/2016 05:00 PM
Tully Community Branch Library, San Jose

There Once Was An Island - 02/23/2016 05:00 PM
Bascom Library and Community Center, San Jose

The Future of Urban Transport - 02/23/2016 06:30 PM
IEEE Santa Clara Valley Consumer Electronics, Santa Clara

The Future of Urban Transport - 02/23/2016 06:30 PM
IEEE Santa Clara Valley Consumer Electronics, Santa Clara

Golden Gate Cetacean Research Organization: The Porpoises and Dolphins of the SF Bay Area - 02/23/2016 07:00 PM
Bay Model Visitors Center, Sausalito

A Cancer in the Family: Take Control of Your Genetic Inheritance - 02/23/2016 07:00 PM
Oshman Family JCC, Palo Alto

An Ethical Philosophy of Land Use: How to Care for Our Only World - 02/23/2016 08:00 PM
Mountain View Center for the Performing Arts, Mountain View


Wednesday, 02/24/2016
CITRIS Research Exchange: Web of Systems - 02/24/2016 12:00 PM
CITRIS at UC Berkeley, Berkeley

National Engineers Week: Flight Simulation - 02/24/2016 03:30 PM
Hiller Aviation Museum, San Carlos

Pace of Change: Silicon Valley and the West Wing - 02/24/2016 04:10 PM
South Hall, Berkeley

Why We Have Effective Agreements to Protect the Ozone Layer But Not to Stabilize Climate - 02/24/2016 04:10 PM
Martin Luther King Jr. Student Union, Berkeley

The San Francisco Foundation: Building Climate Equity and Community Resilience - 02/24/2016 06:00 PM
Commonwealth Club, San Francisco

The Fight for Water - 02/24/2016 06:00 PM
Gilroy Library, Gilroy

Not on the Test Lecture Series: Kimberly Bryant of Black Girls Code - 02/24/2016 06:30 PM
Berkeley City College Auditorium, Berkeley

Physics Caberet: The Latest Science in the News! - 02/24/2016 07:00 PM
Science Buzz Cafe, Sebastopol

Rock Identification - 02/24/2016 07:00 PM
Hillview Community Center, Los Altos

What's Getting into Your Lungs?: The Effects of Smoke, Ozone, Allergens & More - 02/24/2016 07:30 PM
Marin Science Seminar, San Rafael

It all comes together at the ends: telomeres, telomerase, and human disease - 02/24/2016 07:30 PM
Science on Tap, Santa Cruz


Thursday, 02/25/2016
National Engineers Week: Mars Lander - 02/25/2016 03:30 PM
Hiller Aviation Museum, San Carlos

Protein Folding - On and Off the Ribosome - 02/25/2016 04:00 PM
Stanford University, Stanford

Water Detectives - 02/25/2016 04:00 PM
Saratoga Library, Saratoga

Dark and Stormy Nightlife - 02/25/2016 06:00 PM
California Academy of Sciences, San Francisco

Osteoporosis: Prevention and Treatment - 02/25/2016 07:00 PM
Stanford Hospital Health Library, Palo Alto

The Gold Rush and the 1906 Earthquake: How they combined to create the breakthrough discovery of modern seismic science - 02/25/2016 07:00 PM
USGS Evening Public Lecture Series, Menlo Park

Full-Spectrum Science with Ron Hipschman: The Last Doubling - 02/25/2016 08:00 PM
Exploratorium, San Francisco


Friday, 02/26/2016
Fungi of Tule - 02/26/2016 03:30 PM
Tule Ponds at Tyson Lagoon, Fremont

National Engineers Week: Water Rockets - 02/26/2016 03:30 PM
Hiller Aviation Museum, San Carlos

Water Detectives - 02/26/2016 03:30 PM
Tully Community Branch Library, San Jose

Water Detectives - 02/26/2016 03:30 PM
Alum Rock Branch Library, San Jose

Earth Under Water - 02/26/2016 04:30 PM
Tully Community Branch Library, San Jose


Saturday, 02/27/2016
Guided Nature Walk - 02/27/2016 09:30 AM
Bouverie Preserve, Glen Ellen

34th Annual San Francisco Middle School Science Fair on Display Awards Ceremony - 02/27/2016 10:00 AM
California Academy of Sciences, San Francisco

Science Saturday: Worms, Slugs & Bugs - 02/27/2016 11:00 AM
Pacific Grove Museum of Natural History, Pacific Grove

Trekking the Model - 02/27/2016 01:30 PM
Bay Model Visitors Center, Sausalito

Roboticist Kevin Roche presents ThinBot, the cocktail serving robot, and other cool machines - 02/27/2016 02:00 PM
Civic Center Library, Livermore

The Fight for Water - 02/27/2016 04:00 PM
Alum Rock Branch Library, San Jose

Family STEM Overnigher - 02/27/2016 06:00 PM
The Tech Museum of Innovation, San Jose

Science Fiction or Science Fact? - 02/27/2016 07:00 PM
Chabot Space and Science Center, Oakland


Sunday, 02/28/2016
HOUSEPLANTS 101: Indoor Tropicals with Brian the Orchid Guy - 02/28/2016 10:00 AM
UC Botanical Garden, Berkeley

Marine Mammal Parents and Pups - 02/28/2016 10:00 AM
Marine Mammal Center, Sausalito


Monday, 02/29/2016
The Optical-Infrared Extinction Curve and its Variation in the Milky Way - 02/29/2016 11:00 AM
Kavli Institute Astrophysics Colloquium, Stanford

The Fight for Water - 02/29/2016 04:00 PM
Rose Garden Branch Library, San Jose

VERY-HIGH-ENERGY ASTROPARTICLE PHYSICS - 02/29/2016 04:00 PM
Sonoma State University - What Physicists Do, Rohnert Park

Water-Energy Nexus with New Materials Technology - 02/29/2016 04:30 PM
Stanford University Energy Seminar, Stanford

Nerd Night East Bay #39: Vowel Shift, Bee Habitats, Jugger - 02/29/2016 07:00 PM
Club 21, Oakland
Copyright © 2016 bayareascience.org, All rights reserved.


unsubscribe from this list    update subscription preferences 

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp