Copy
As Albertans, we are all aware of the economic clouds that have been hanging over our province for the last two years. Those clouds are starting to clear but the impact of the recession will linger as many people continue to struggle to find work and as businesses and families try to make up the ground they lost during the downturn.
Want to share this Owl?
The Owl header
ATB Financial's Economics & Research Team April 20, 2017
Adapting to the post-recession economy
As Albertans, we are all aware of the economic clouds that have been hanging over our province for the last two years. Those clouds are starting to clear but the impact of the recession will linger as many people continue to struggle to find work and as businesses and families try to make up the ground they lost during the downturn.

In addition to the personal adapting that has been required to make it through the recession, the drop in oil prices combined with the ongoing efforts to reduce GHG emissions have many wondering—and not for the first time— if we need to start adapting to a world in which the oil sector is no longer a mainstay of our economy. The global thirst for oil is not about to dry up, but what if it eventually does?
 
From getting laid off during a downturn to protracted opposition to one of Alberta’s primary industries, unwanted change takes many forms and is something we all experience.
 
With this in mind, ATB's Todd Hirsch and Rob Roach have collected 15 stories of Canadians who found ways to not only adapt, but thrive, when unwanted change came their way in their new book Spiders in Space: Successful Adapting to Unwanted Change. From Canadian Paralympian Michele Salt who lost her leg in a motorcycle accident to the Canadian wine industry’s renaissance after the Free Trade Agreement was supposed to kill it, the stories—and the set of adaptive behaviours that emerges from them—are both inspiring and instructive.
 
For a copy of Spiders in Space or to book the authors to give a presentation based on it, please visit toddhirsch.com.
Share this Owl: