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The Best! weekly.  Photos, ideas, and information from New York's rural libraries in your inbox!  An eNewsletter of the Rural Libraries Round Table
The Best!  An eNewslettter of the RLRT.  Can't see this image? Click View in browser above
September 23, 2016

The Best! Notes 
Eli Guinnee, Editor, eguinnee@cclslib.org 


We need RLRT volunteers to staff the RLRT booth at NYLA! Contact President Margo Gustina at gustinam@stls.org if you can help.  
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There hasn't been much chatter on the RLRT email list lately.  Don't forget, you can email your rural library questions, comments, notices, whatever you want to fellow RLRTers here: nyla-rlrt@lm.list.nyla.org.  
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Do you subscribe to the CEFLS Pathfinder?  It's full of great stuff for rural libraries. Check out the newest edition here.  
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I'm reprinting the Best Advice! question from last issue because I think it could use more voices.  "The Man" want's to know how to support young entrepreurs. Can libraries effectivey and legally play a role in developing real life entrepreneur skills? Let us now what you think or what you've done that works! 
 
Photo of the week

Click above to learn more 

Not yet a The Best! subscriber yet?  Try it, it's free and easy and open to all (we just ask that you please love libraries, and consider joining RLRT, it's only $5!).

The Best Advice!

Ask for Advice | Give Advice


This Week's Question (again) : Supporting Young Entrepreneurs

Q: A favorite library kid recently asked if he could have a little space to set up a small business in the library. He wants to sell ‘good quality’ snacks and drinks to other middle school/high school aged students to raise money for a trip to Japan. I really don’t want to say no to him because it's such a great opportunity for learning about running a business but this would go directly against our policy of businesses profiting in the library (a big no-no). Is there a creative way that I could make this happen for the sake of this young entrepreneur? --The Man
 

Last Week's Q & Reader Answers

QA favorite library kid recently asked if he could have a little space to set up a small business in the library. He wants to sell ‘good quality’ snacks and drinks to other middle school/high school aged students to raise money for a trip to Japan. I really don’t want to say no to him because it's such a great opportunity for learning about running a business but this would go directly against our policy of businesses profiting in the library (a big no-no). Is there a creative way that I could make this happen for the sake of this young entrepreneur? --The Man

A: I sometimes let children sell their artwork at our art gallery openings and we have never had any complaints about it. There might be legal issues that I'm not thinking about, but I can't imagine anyone would have a problem with a kid selling things.  --A.P. 


Bonus advice for No Name, who wanted to know if a children's librarian should do planning work from home:  

AMy part time Children's Librarian will be changing her schedule to come in before the library opens to get planning work done. Having been a classroom teacher and school librarian, I understand how necessary it is to have the physical and mental space to create cohesive, coherent lessons. The constant interruptions of a busy library are just too hard to work through if the goal is to create a quality product. I suggest you give the work from home scenario a 3 month trial and see what the results are.--libraryannie

 
Disagree with any of the advice above?  Add your two cents here.

The Best! Disclaimer: Advice offered in this column is for entertainment purposes only. Please assume that The Best! readers are not lawyers, and while all The Best! readers are super intelligent geniuses with many years of experience, please nonetheless consult your lawyer or library system on legal issues, HR snafus, policy questions, and other areas in which anonymous comments from strangers might normally be treated with caution.

The Best! Poll 


What is the best answer to a yes/no question?
 Yes 
No
I reject artificial dichotomies

Should non-automated public libraries be required to dump the card catalog and automate?

 No--57.1%
Yes--42.9%

The Best! 

This week's stat is: 

14.2%

(Mystery revealed at bottom of page)

The Best! NewsNews


Reed Library Celebrates Their Zweig Collection

Once one of the most popular authors in the world, Zweig has more recently been the inspiration for the film The Grand Budapest Hotel.  By great luck, much of his archives has landed in Fredonia at the Reed Library

 

Olean Public Library in the Halloween "Spirit"

Tuesday, October 11th, 12:30-2pm
Adult Crafternoon – Recycled Soda Bottle Ghosts 

No supplies needed. Make a ghost out of an old 16oz pop bottle and some cheese cloth. Felt and buttons will also be provided to decorate the ghost however you would like.
 

Wimodaughsian Free Library Hosts New York Spirits 

The Wimodaughsian Free Library of Canisteo is proud to present "New York Spirits," by Cris Johnson, on Friday October 21 at 6:30pm. Cris presents information and artifacts about known spirits in New York State. Plan to be educated and maybe a little scared! For teens and adults only.


CCLS Sponsors MiniMakerFaire  

The inaugural Fredonia Mini Maker Faire is a FREE celebration open to the public on Saturday, Oct. 22, 2016 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on the campus of The State University of New York at Fredonia.

The family-friendly event is a CIRCUS OF CREATIVITY for ALL AGES and ALL ABILITIES. There will be FREE PARKING and a variety of Buffalo-based FOOD TRUCKS will be onsite offering a variety of foods and beverages.

Meet STEM-and art-based Makers of all ages and abilities, ask questions, participate in free make-and-take activities and let your curiosity get the best of you!
 

The Humanities and Technology Camp= THATCamp


On Tuesday, Oct. 25, in Doyle Hall the St. Bonaventure University Friedsam Memorial Library and the History Department will be hosting a THATCamp.  More info and register here.   

What is a THATCamp?  It is an unconference.  At an unconference, participants determine the topics to be covered and work collaboratively to help each other.  The rules of an unconference are (1) have fun, (2) be productive, and (3) stay collegial.  THATCamps are open to any and all disciplines providing an opportunity to collaboratively explore common themes around technology, education, and teaching.  The camp is free and open to all. 

Want to host your own?  View a video about THATCamp. 
 

Where are these libraries?

Click to locate featured libraries and find contact info.

Opportunities

*New Opportunities in Red

September 25 - October 1—Banned Books Week
     
Resources here. 
October 9-15-- Teen Read Week
     Resources here. 
October 27-29 @ Fargo, North DakotaARSL Conference 
     The Association for Rural Small Libraries Annual Conference 
November 2-5 @ SaratogaNYLA Annual Conference (Details here)  
     Contact Margo to sign up for a slot to man the RLRT booth!
January 20-24-- Ala Midwinter Atlanta
     Registration Open

The Best! tips 

Valle Blair
Youth Services Librarian, CCLS



TEEN READ WEEK 2016 – October 9-15
Use this special event to highlight your YA materials and services.  Celebrate with your teens!  Plan a special program or a passive program that is available all week and promote it in your local school! 
Teen Read Week™ is a national adolescent literacy initiative created by the Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA). It is held annually in October the same week as Columbus Day. Its purpose is to encourage teens to be regular readers and library users. 
http://teenreadweek.ning.com/ - YALSA’s official site for ideas to celebrate TRW
http://www.alastore.ala.org/trw - to order posters, bookmarks, etc.
https://www.pinterest.com/ - search for Teen Read Week for a variety of active and passive programming ideas
 
  
Excerpt: Read the full spotlight here.  


Sydney Your Say: Placemaking the Library

Submitted by Jennifer Ferriss.

Placemaking inspires people to collectively reimagine and reinvent public spaces as the heart of every community.” The City of Sydney (Australia) embraces Placemaking. A website devoted to community input, Sydney Your Say is where Sydneysiders can speak up, sign up for a newsletter, see a calendar of events and follow city projects’ progress.

One project that is currently under construction is the Green Square Library and Plaza. The first Saturday of each month an Infohub, or dynamic space where residents can drop in and share and gather information with decision makers and community leaders is an ongoing effort to keep the community involved in this urban revitalization project.

The $47 million project includes... Read on here

Great things happening at your library?

Send your photos, news, happenings, ideas and information to Eli Guinnee, editor.
eguinnee@cclslib.org  
(if you got this by email, just hit reply)

Become a Rural Libraries Roundtable member 

It's So Easy to Become a Member Now!  
NYLA members can now add additional Section and Round Table memberships to their existing membership online!   
1.  
Log In to nyla.org
2. Click on ‘personal record detail’ from the left-hand menu
3. Click ‘Add Sections / Round Tables’ from the list of options.  
4. Choose the Rural Libraries Round Table (cause we're The Best! if you haven't heard)
Contacts
Margo Gustina, President: gustinam@stls.org
Eli Guinnee, eNewsletter Editor: eguinnee@cclslib.org 
Tom Vitale, Marketing Team: tvitale@cclslib.org
Leona Chereshnoski, VP and Program Committee Chair:  osclib@ncls.org

RLRT Website
Webmaster: Angela Gonzales
 Back to top

And the mystery stat is...


The percentage of children's books published in 2015 that featured diverse characters: 14.2% 


Click above for more information
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